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November 6, 2018 — California General Election
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County

San Francisco CountyCandidate for Supervisor, District 10

Photo of Shamann Walton

Shamann Walton

San Francisco Board of Education Commissioner
9,550 votes (41.22%)Winning
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My Top 3 Priorities

  • Affordability, Transportation, Environmental Mindfulness, & the Eastern Neighborhoods Plan
  • Increasing Economic Opportunity, Public Safety, & Solving Homelessness
  • Oversight of the Hunters Point Shipyard testing and cleanup

Experience

Experience

Profession:San Francisco Board of Education Commissioner
President, Comissioner, San Francisco Board of Education (2014–current)
Executive Director, Young Community Developers (2010–current)
Commissioner, San Francisco Board of Education — Elected position (2014–2018)
President, San Francisco Board of Education — Elected position (2017–2018)
Program Officer, San Francisco Department of Children, Youth and Families (2008–2010)
Director, Potrero Hill Family Resource Center, Economic Opportunity Council of San Francisco (2006–2008)
School Readiness Team Leader, Potrero Hill Family Resource Center, Economic Opportunity Council of San Francisco (2003–2006)

Education

San Francisco State University Masters in Public Administration, Public Administration - Public Management emphasis (2010)
Morris Brown College Bachelors of Arts, Political Science; cum laude (1998)

Biography

Shamann Walton was born in San Francisco and lived in public housing at an early age in Bayview and Potrero Hill. He has worked in District 10 neighborhoods for decades and has witnessed firsthand the challenges our community faces from long-time residents being pushed out of the city to losing childhood friends to violence and incarceration. As an accomplished and experienced community leader, Shamann has dedicated his life to improving these realities in our community and is committed to identifying solutions to our pressing issues. He has a proven track record of creating positive change in the community he serves.

 

As president and member of the San Francisco Board of Education, Shamann spearhead the effort to close the achievement gap for Black, Latino, and special needs students and helped secure the funding for the school district's first African American Achievement and Leadership Initiative. He worked to protect undocumented students, decreased teacher turnover, increase graduation rates across the district for Black and Latino students, secured the financing and identified a site for our first affordable housing units for educators, and fought to make sure that Mission Bay will have its first school built in the next few years.

 

As the Executive Director at Young Community Developers (YCD), Shamann works vigorously to build close relationships with labor to provide job and career opportunities for residents and bring 100% affordable housing units to District 10. Under his leadership, YCD has increased their annual budget by more than $9 million dollars and used those funds to better the lives of D10 residents by placing them in jobs and careers, developing affordable housing (100% at Candlestick Park), eliminating employment barriers and increasing education outcomes with credit recovery and tutorial services for students.

 

Shamann is passionate about quality public education, options for living-wage jobs, safer neighborhoods, affordable housing, support services for the homeless, and universal healthcare. As Supervisor, he will strongly advocate for communities from low-income and working-class neighborhoods. He will also work to improve our schools, bring more jobs to the district, increase access to affordable housing, bridge relationships amongst all diverse communities, stop gun violence, and ensure we have safe open spaces.

 

Shamann is proud to have published a complete policy platform and publicly lay out the actionable steps he will take within his first 100 days in office. Our “Vision for District 10” - a comprehensive policy platform detailing Shamann’s actionable plans to address major issues facing District 10 during his tenure as Supervisor - is available for viewing and download at shamnnwalton.com/vision.

 

Shamann is a proud father to his two adult children, Monique and Malcolm, who are both graduates of Bay Area public schools. He lives in the Bayview with his wife, Mesha, and his two stepsons--one who is a graduate of SFUSD and one who is starting high school.

 

www.shamannwalton.com

Who supports this candidate?

Featured Endorsements

  • San Francisco Chronicle
  • San Francisco Examiner
  • San Francisco Democratic Party

Organizations (46)

  • Planned Parenthood Norcal Action Fund
  • Bay Area Reporter
  • San Francisco Bay Guardian #2
  • San Francisco Labor Council
  • SEIU United Service Workers West
  • SEIU Local 1021
  • SEIU Local 87 – Janitors Union (#1)
  • Sheet Metal Workers Local 104
  • Teamsters Joint Council 7 (#1)
  • UA Local 38, Plumbers & Pipefitters
  • United Democratic Club
  • Unite Here! Local 2
  • United Educators of San Francisco – Educators’ Union
  • San Francisco Young Democrats
  • San Francisco Women’s Political Committee
  • AFT2121: City College of San Francisco Faculty Union (#1)
  • Latin@ Young Democrats of San Francisco
  • International Federation of Professional & Technical Engineers Local 21
  • Harvey Milk LGBTQ Democratic Club (#2)
  • Glaziers, Architectural Metal and Glass Workers Local Union 718
  • Gay Asian Pacific Alliance (#2)
  • Edwin M. Lee Asian Pacific Democratic Club (Dual)
  • FDR Democratic Club of San Francisco for Seniors & People with Disabilities
  • Evolve California
  • Eastern Neighborhoods Democratic Club (#1)
  • Carpet, Linoleum & Soft Tile Workers Local Union 12, District Council 16
  • Carpenters Local 22
  • Alice B. Toklas GLBT Democratic Club (#1)
  • Affordable Housing Alliance
  • LiUNA Local 261 (#1)
  • National Union of Healthcare Workers (Dual)
  • San Francisco Tenants Union (Dual)
  • San Francisco Rising Action Fund
  • San Francisco Municipal Executives Association
  • San Francisco Latino Democratic Club
  • San Francisco Firefighters Local 798 (#1)
  • San Francisco Deputy Probation Officers Association
  • San Francisco Deputy Sheriffs Association
  • San Francisco Democratic Women in Action
  • Operator Engineers Local 3
  • Rose Pak Democratic Club
  • San Francisco Bicycle Coalition (Dual)
  • San Francisco Building and Construction Trades Council (#1)
  • San Francisco Community Tenants Association
  • California Nurses Association
  • San Francisco Examiner

Elected Officials (39)

  • San Francisco Public Defender Jeff Adachi
  • Former San Francisco Mayor Art Agnos
  • The Late Honorable San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee
  • San Francisco Mayor London Breed
  • California State Controller Betty Yee
  • California Democratic Party Chair John Burton
  • Lieutenant Governor Gavin Newsom
  • San Francisco Assessor & Recorder Carmen Chu
  • San Francisco President of the Board of Supervisors & District 10 Supervsior Malia Cohen
  • San Francisco District 11 Supervisor Ahsha Safai
  • San Francisco District 9 Supervisor Hillary Ronen
  • San Francisco District 8 Supervisor Rafael Mandelman
  • San Francisco District 7 Supervisor Norman Yee
  • San Francisco District 5 Supervisor Vallie Brown
  • San Francisco District 3 Supervisor Aaron Peskin
  • San Francisco District 1 Supervisor Sandra Lee Fewer
  • State Senator Scott Wiener
  • Assemblymember David Chiu
  • Assemblymember Phil Ting
  • Former District 10 Supervisor & San Francisco Democratic County Central Committee Vice-Chair Sophie Maxwell
  • Former District 9 Supervisor & San Francisco Democratic County Central Committee Chair David Campos
  • San Francisco Board of Education Commissioner Mark Sanchez
  • San Francisco Board of Education Commissioner Rachel Norton
  • San Francisco Board of Education Commissioner Emily Murase
  • San Francisco Board of Education Commissioner Matt Haney
  • San Francisco Board of Education Commissioner Stevon Cook
  • San Francisco Board of Education President Hydra Mendoza-McDonnell
  • Former San Francisco District 1 Supervisor Eric Mar
  • Former San Francisco District 11 Supervisor John Avalos
  • City College of San Francisco Board of Trustee Thea Selby
  • City College of San Francisco Board of Trustee Tom Temprano
  • City College of San Francisco Board of Trustee Shanell Williams
  • City College of San Francisco Board of Trustee Ivy Lee
  • City College of San Francisco Board of Trustee Alex Randolph
  • City College of San Francisco Board of Trustee Brigitte Davila
  • Bart Board Director Lateefah Simon
  • San Francisco Democratic County Central Committee Member Keith Baraka
  • San Francisco Democratic County Central Committee Member Tom Hsieh, Jr.
  • BART Board Director Bevan Dufty

Questions & Answers

Questions from League of Women Voters of San Francisco (3)

What do you see as the biggest challenge in your district, and what would you do to address it?
Answer from Shamann Walton:

Affordability/Open Space: We have an affordability crisis that is causing seniors, low-income families, and working class people to be forced out of the City. District 10 has the highest population of low-income and working class communities of color who are at risk of eviction, displacement, or becoming homeless. To combat this, we must preserve our existing rent-controlled units and expand rent control while also protecting our small property owners so they are incentivized to rent their units. Since there are plenty of opportunities for the city to develop or convert publicly owned lots for affordable and below market rate opportunities for families, we should also increase the number of municipally owned or controlled housing. Finally, I’m committed to building thousands of affordable housing units for all income levels over the next 8 years. By bringing my experience developing affordable housing to City Hall, I can prioritize affordable housing projects currently in the pipeline, eliminate barriers so more can be built, and ensure that our district leads the City in affordable housing units.

I also believe zoning should remain in the hands of the local leadership and community because we are the ones affected by the impacts of developments. There is a balance that can and must be struck between maintaining open spaces and implementing creative solutions like increasing height limits for affordable housing projects near transit hubs. If we want to solve the housing crisis, we must work towards achieving this balance rather than simply stake out positions on either side of these issues.

Transportation: Access to reliable public transportation is imperative, and District 10 families must be able to move around the city with greater ease. As Supervisor, I will work directly with SFMTA leadership and other elected officials to bring reliable and accessible transportation to District 10. This includes implementing rapid bus lines, creating efficient connections from east to west neighborhoods, expanding the T-Line, and eliminating the practice of switch-backs. I will ensure that developers comply with the Transportation Sustainability Fee by paying for their impacts on SF’s urban ecosystem. If developers want to build here, they need to work with our existing residents by demonstrating this minimal level of care and concern for the health of the City instead of just being concerned with their profits.

The Environment: District 10 has the most low-income and working class residents in the City and is disproportionately affected by pollution and environmental injustices. Environmental issues in District 10 are civil rights issues, and I have an unwavering dedication to addressing this reality. As the home of the vast majority of the City’s production, distribution, and repair facilities, we carry the brunt of San Francisco’s pollution. As Supervisor, it will be my priority to make sure the Navy and Tetra Tech pay for a complete and immediate clean-up of the Shipyard, provide adequate healthcare for our residents living on or near the Shipyard, and establish requirements that new developments are built with greater sustainability and environmental goals in mind.

What experience or qualifications do you have that make you well suited for this role?
Answer from Shamann Walton:

As the former Director of the Potrero Hill Family Resource Center (PHFRC), I focused on increasing resources for families in public housing and improving education in public schools. During my tenure at the PHFRC, we brought the public housing and homeowner communities in Potrero Hill together and started a Peace March in 2005. The Peace March still continues to happen annually, uniting hundreds of students and residents to take a stand against violence and promote peace in our neighborhoods.

 

As President and member of the San Francisco Board of Education, I spearhead the effort to close the achievement gap for Black, Latino, and special needs students and I helped secure the funding for the school district's first African American Achievement and Leadership Initiative. I worked to protect undocumented students, secured the financing and identified a site for our first affordable housing units for educators, and fought to make sure that Mission Bay will have its first school built in the next few years. I have helped decrease teacher turnover in our Southeast sector schools and increase graduation rates across the district (including for our Black and Latino students).

As the Executive Director at Young Community Developers (YCD), I work vigorously to build close relationships with labor to provide job and career opportunities for residents and bring 100% affordable housing units to District 10. Under my leadership, we have increased YCD’s annual budget by more than $9 million dollars and used those funds to better the lives of D10 residents by placing them in jobs and careers, developing affordable housing (100% at Candlestick Park), eliminating employment barriers and increasing education outcomes with credit recovery and tutorial services for students. I have also aggressively pursued neighborhood preference certificate holders, residents who have been forced to move outside of the City, back to the Bayview and into 100% affordable housing units.

 

I am passionate about quality public education, options for living-wage jobs, safer neighborhoods, affordable housing, support services for the homeless, and universal healthcare. I will work to improve our schools, bring more jobs to the district, increase access to affordable housing, bridge relationships amongst all diverse communities, stop gun violence, and ensure we have safe open spaces. That is why I am endorsed by eight Supervisors: President Malia Cohen, Sandra Lee Fewer, Aaron Peskin, Vallie Brown, Norman Yee, Rafael Mandelman, Hillary Ronen, and Ahsha Safai, all the commissioners of the San Francisco Board of Education, four members of the City College Board of Trustees, several members of the SF Democratic County Central Committee, Lieutenant Governor Gavin Newsom, Assemblymember Phil Ting and David Chiu, Senator Scott Wiener, Mayor London Breed, former Mayor Art Agnos, San Francisco Public Defender Jeff Adachi and more elected leaders. These are leaders of our community who know my work and know that I can bring people together to lead and advocate for all our communities.

What are your priorities when it comes to the environmental impact of development in your district and what solutions do you propose?
Answer from Shamann Walton:

All infrastructure changes or developments must have community input. With all the development happening/coming to our area in the near future, and particularly given the high rate of residents being priced out of their homes in District 10 and San Francisco’s Black community, it is crucial that our residents be involved in every step of incoming developments and in determining the corresponding community benefit projects.

 

I believe zoning should remain in the hands of the local leadership and community because we are the ones affected by the impact development has on our environment and infrastructure. We must achieve a balance between community benefits and increasing our housing supply, and that starts with active community involvement in revising the Eastern Neighborhoods Plan. I’m tired of our eastern neighborhood homeowners having to pool personal money together to pay for basic community improvements, and believe the City and developers should be paying for our infrastructure upgrades instead. That is why I believe it is imperative our City revisit and revise the current Eastern Neighborhoods Plan (“ENP”) to not only cover every District 10 neighborhood, but to also ensure the City uses the resources brought in from Impact Fees to directly benefit the D10 communities where development is occurring.

 

We all know that the southeastern part of San Francisco has historically been disproportionately affected by environmental injustices. Our neighborhoods, which have the most low-income and working-class residents in the entire City, bear the brunt of San Francisco’s environmental issues, and it is important that this is kept in mind when development comes into our District. Environmental issues in District 10 are civil rights issues, and I have an unwavering dedication to addressing this reality, decades of public service experience, and a team ready to take on these challenges. It is only by engaging the community and working together that we can ensure that our community never has to face the kind of environmental catastrophe we’re seeing at the Hunters Point Shipyard again. As Supervisor, I promise to make sure that when we talk, they listen downtown. If they decide not to listen, we will call hearings to make sure that they focus on what we need to do and get accomplished right away. Residents of the southeast will not be ignored by City Hall during my tenure as Supervisor.

 

When it comes to the Shipyard, all development at Hunter’s Point should be completely halted until the entire area has been re-tested and proven safe. I plan to convene a task force that would monitor and oversee the re-testing of the entire Shipyard, including the parcel that is currently excluded from re-testing plans, and ensure that the testing goes further than only surface-level soil. This task force would be open to the public and consult with the residents of the area, and I would not support re-starting development in the former Shipyard until all concerns have been satisfactorily addressed, resolved, and testing absolutely demonstrates that there is no further to resident health.

Political Beliefs

Position Papers

Public Transit and Infrastructure, Solving Homelessness, and Economic Empowerment

Summary

Access to reliable public transportation is critical to supporting our families, and District 10 residents should be able to move around the city in a reasonable amount of time. I will work with MUNI to address existing concerns with the T-line and push for faster, better service, as well as improve conditions for alternate methods of transportation such as bike-sharing.

 

 We need to get to the root causes of homelessness and address them systematically while also creating short-term, creative solutions. I am committed to strategically increasing the City's resources to create transitional and permanent housing for our homeless population that provide substance abuse, mental health, and job training and placement services.

 

I know how hard it is to find careers with fair pay, sufficient benefits, and opportunities for growth. As Executive Director of Young Community Developers, I help people throughout our city find good jobs that allow them to stay in San Francisco and support their families. As Supervisor, I will create local hiring policies and incentives that ensure all new and existing companies invest in our residents first.

PUBLIC TRANSIT / PUBLIC INFRASTRUCTURE

District 10 has the highest low-income and working class population in the city, yet we lack the robust public transit system and basic bike-riding infrastructure present in wealthier districts.The ability to get from point A to point B can determine someone’s ability to earn a decent living, get an education, and get their kids to school, so access to reliable public transportation is critical to supporting our families.

 

The SFMTA often ignores the southeastern neighborhoods. Monolingual communities are not involved in the decision-making process because the SFMTA lacks staff to conduct outreach in the communities’ respective language. The result is that our eastern neighborhoods have experienced the highest growth, but our public infrastructure, including public transportation, has not kept up with that population expansion. I believe it is critical that San Francisco’s roads, transit system, and other vital infrastructure expand as housing units are added. It does the City little good to grow our population without simultaneously making changes to accommodate residents comfortably, and this can be easily achieved through collaboration with existing residents.

 

The lack of public transportation in rapid growth areas such as Mission Bay, Dogpatch, Potrero Hill, and India Basin force many to drive everywhere they go in the City. This is exacerbated by the fact that the T-line consistently switches back at 22nd and 3rd Street, leaving Bayview and Visitacion Valley residents stranded in Dogpatch with no connection home. To ensure San Francisco’s southeast is not forgotten during future infrastructure and project planning, I plan to serve on transportation boards and work closely with our leaders in transportation throughout my tenure as Supervisor. I will connect the SFMTA with community organizations in District 10 so our voices will be heard and prioritized, as well as fund in-department positions that provide culturally competent and language accessible services.

 

I will also continue working directly with the leadership of SFMTA to bring reliable and accessible transportation to District 10 by implementing rapid bus lines, creating efficient connections from east to west neighborhoods, expanding/improving the T-Line, and eliminating the practice of switchbacks. I am very interested in exploring the potential of putting the T-Line underground, which would open up additional space along the 3rd Street corridor for bike lanes and alternative transit options. Some of these ideas involve long-term investments, however, I believe that San Francisco will not succeed in becoming a Transit First City until more attention and resources are put into public and alternative transit options for the residents of District 10.

 

To fund these projects, I will first ensure the funds approved by voters in 2014 and 2016 are used to maintain core infrastructure, enhance existing networks, and expand to accommodate growth in the southeast. These funds can be supplemented by revising the Eastern Neighborhoods Plan to cover all District 10 neighborhoods and require developers to pay a Transportation Sustainability Fee as a condition of building here. If we couple this with adequate planning, such as including inflation and increased construction costs in bid projections, we can avoid missing deadlines and inaccurate cost estimates in future projects.

 

IMPROVING BIKING INFRASTRUCTURE

Given the lack of reliable public transportation options within District 10, I strongly support the expansion of bike-sharing into the area. However, there needs to be concerted effort to improve the condition of streets throughout the district to ensure these services do not negatively impact San Francisco’s Vision Zero goal, as well as jobs programs and opportunities created for residents. I have collaborated with the SF Bike Coalition to bring safer bike routes to District 10 in the past, and, as Supervisor, would be interested in expanding this partnership to address this issue.



PREVIOUS SUCCESSES

  • Collaborated with the SF Bicycle Coalition to provide community bike repair services for District 10 residents.

  • Collaborated with the Bike Coalition to give away bikes to low-income youth and promote alternative transportation options.

  • Worked with City leaders to ensure that the “Safe Routes to School (SRTS)” program maintained adequate levels of funding.



HOMELESSNESS

Homelessness is a major issue in San Francisco, but our eastern neighborhoods bear the majority of the responsibility due to having the highest population of homeless individuals. Our residents should not have to dodge needles and feces while strolling in their neighborhoods, and our homeless residents need supportive services to help them get back on their feet. As Supervisor, I am committed to strategically increasing the City’s resources to create transitional and permanent housing for our homeless population.

 

Currently, San Francisco shelters do not allow individuals to bring their partners or belongings in with them and many individuals feel unsafe staying there. However, in Navigation Centers, individuals are able to stay for longer periods of time, bring their belongings and their partners, not worry about getting kicked out the next day, and are given the support they need to be able to move into permanent housing - allowing us to focus on connecting people to supportive services and housing so that they can be permanently off the streets. This is why I believe our City needs to both put resources into creating more Navigation Centers and to start running existing city shelters with a similar model.

 

In addition, we need to work closely with the Homeless Outreach Team (HOT) and the Department of Public Works to bring people into supportive services instead of having homeless people simply relocate after a sweep, increase the City’s mental health and addiction treatment services, and end the practice of releasing non-violent, mentally ill and/or addicted individuals from jail directly back to the street. While these measures go into effect, the City should also be piloting additional creative solutions, such as the overnight program I partnered with Supervisor Hillary Ronen to create at Buena Vista Horace Mann K-8 School. The program there will turn one of the school’s gyms into a refuge where homeless students and their families can have access to beds, warm dinners, bagged breakfasts, and an opportunity to shower. This is a good short term option for our families, however, I believe we can and should do more.

 

In the long-term, the City should purchase abandoned buildings, vacant hotels, and old dormitories (like the Academy of Arts property) that we can turn into additional temporary, transionary, and low-income housing. As Supervisor, I would push our City’s Real Estate Division to aggressively acquire property that we can use to increase housing options, including vacant lots and small sites where affordable and supportive housing can be built. We must increase both of these housing options within the City so that we not only reduce the wait for city shelters, but have realistic options for people to transition to after a stay in supportive housing.

 

In addition, Proposition C - the ballot measure that would increase funds for homeless, mental health, and addiction services by creating a one half-percent tax on businesses making more that $50 million annually within San Francisco, will give us the resources we need to provide a home for over 4,000 people. I have been a strong proponent of the measure by writing two ballot arguments in favor in the upcoming official ballot guide. I have such strong feelings about this because the reality is that one in 25 children in SFUSD are sleeping without a home every night. Our teachers are working with students traumatized by the instability of homelessness every day. Educating and learning are severely impacted by the crisis occurring in San Francisco and we need Prop C: Our City, Our Home, to give students the housing and support they deserve. Additionally, it's no secret that San Francisco's African American population has been among the hardest hit during the housing and homelessness crisis. Supporting Prop C will help house this disproportionate number of African Americans and all homeless individuals living on the streets in San Francisco.

 

PREVIOUS SUCCESSES

  • Created an overnight pilot program that turns a gym at Buena Vista Horace Mann K-8 School into a refuge where homeless students and their families have access to beds, warm dinners, bagged breakfasts, and an opportunity to shower.

  • Ensured staffing for the Dogpatch Navigation Center through my organization, Young Community Developers.

  • Helped develop a successful proposal to bring a new Navigation Center to Bayview, which will be opening on Bayshore in the next month.

  • Co-sponsored a Board of Education resolution to provide additional resources and housing options for homeless students and their families.



JOBS / ECONOMIC EMPOWERMENT

San Francisco is home to some of the wealthiest industries in the world, but not everyone has access to these opportunities. Our City currently has Project Labor Agreements (PLAs) that mandate local hiring practices which provide living wage jobs and training for residents in the construction industry. As Supervisor, the first legislation I would introduce is a Local Mandatory Hiring policy requiring all sectors of employment, not just construction, to hire from existing San Francisco communities and neighborhoods. The policy would start out with a 25% requirement, with the ability to be adjusted upwards based on results, the needs of both the community, and the particular company or industry. This measure would help ensure our residents can continue to stay and thrive in our City.

 

I could also immediately take action regarding the City’s workforce. San Francisco’s departments currently contract out community engagement work because we lack personnel who specialize in this field. This sector of employment could be integrated into existing departments by giving them proper training and developing proper community engagement protocols. I would work with the City and community to hire a local workforce, give local residents a path into City and County of San Francisco jobs, and help eliminate the need to contract out.

 

In District 10 specifically, however, economic policies are intimately tied up with better public transit. We need to have more Public Transit that brings people into our economic corridors. Our neighborhood merchants also need more opportunities to work together on plans and strategies of how to activate each of our neighborhoods and communities. I plan to bring merchants associations together quarterly to devise a plan to increase foot traffic and make our community businesses destination locations. In addition, I would focus on building more housing on top of retail (like has been done in most of San Francisco’s commercial corridors). This would allow businesses to use resources from that housing development to make improvements and repairs while creating more patrons and food traffic in commercial corridors.

 

Lastly, in areas where communities have been blighted or population movement has led to decreases in economic viability, I would work to create “economic empowerment zones.” This would allow small/neighborhood-based businesses an opportunity to compete while employing members of their surrounding community.

 

ADDITIONAL WORKFORCE STRATEGIES

As Supervisor, I will work closely with the San Francisco Labor Council and local businesses as an ally/advocate on the Board that our unions can count on. I will work to strengthen local legislation around employee wages and employee’s rights to fight against policies attacking employees’ rights to stand together in unions and will fully support Labor efforts to increase member organizing to mitigate the impact of the Supreme Court decision in Janus v. AFSCME.

 

PREVIOUS SUCCESSES

 

  • Approved and oversaw contracts with Project Labor Agreements to ensure residents have access to living wage union jobs and can afford to live in San Francisco while serving on the Board of Education.

  • Successfully connected thousands of residents to living wage and unionized jobs through my work at Young Community Developers.

  • Created apprenticeship programs that offer pathways to union careers and other industries.

  • Negotiated pay raises for educators and all of the School District’s personnel while serving as a member of the School Board.

  • Ensured civil services tests so temporary employees of the School District could become permanent district employees and enjoy the benefits of permanent status.

Affordable Housing and the Eastern Neighborhoods Plan

Summary

To put it plainly, it is far too hard to make a life and raise a family in San Francisco right now. People of all races, socioeconomic levels, and in every neighborhood are being priced out of their homes and communities. I will bring my affordable housing development experience to City Hall to increase the housing supply, hold developers accountable for community benefit and transportation fees, and fight for enforcement of neighborhood preference so that we get put at the front of the line for affordable housing in our district.

AFFORDABLE HOUSING & THE EASTERN NEIGHBORHOODS PLAN

It is far too hard to make a life and raise a family in San Francisco right now. Rental prices are astronomical in San Francisco compared to the rest of the country, with prices reaching $3,500-4000 per month on average. This is a crisis that is causing seniors, middle class families, low-income families, and working class people to be forced out of San Francisco. It is why so many of our residents have multiple roommates, live with family in multigenerational households, or in the worst cases, stay in abusive relationships for housing. San Franciscans deserve better -- this is not the reality that we should be accepting.

 

As a renter myself, I understand the plight of this City’s tenants. I have seen too many residents evicted, forced out of the city, or become homeless. Affordable housing must be prioritized, and I can ensure that our district increases our supply of affordable units by bringing my experience developing affordable housing to City Hall. I have committed to building thousands of new affordable housing units for all income levels over the next 8 years because I have already been doing this work. We can achieve this goal by prioritizing the affordable housing projects currently in the pipeline and eliminating barriers so that more can be built. There is a balance that can and must be struck between maintaining our open spaces and implementing creative solutions for housing like increasing the height limits for affordable housing projects near transit hubs. If we want to solve the housing crisis, it is imperative we work towards achieving this balance rather than simply stake out positions on either side of the issues.

 

AFFORDABLE HOUSING

As Supervisor, I plan to use my previous experience building affordable housing with Young Community Developers to build thousands of new affordable units for all income levels throughout the District. To me, “affordable housing” means residents are not spending over a third of their monthly income towards rent. I support requiring higher levels of affordable housing in new development, and believe developers have a responsibility to increase their affordability levels to at least 25% based on the Proposition C that was passed by San Francisco voters in 2016. Finally, I believe that we need affordable housing to start at 40% of Area Median Income (“AMI”) in certain low-income communities.  

 

In regards to market rate housing on public land, I believe that public resources should provide a public benefit, which means that public land should be dedicated for affordable and below market rate opportunities for families. I also support the idea of municipally owned or controlled housing. San Francisco owns various public lots that have the potential to be developed and converted into affordable and below market rate opportunities for families. This public land should be utilized to build affordable projects such as teacher housing through public-private partnerships with nonprofit developers.

 

As Supervisor, I would also use my past experience to ensure that communities surrounding proposed developments are consulted in negotiations, have a chance to have requests included and/or concerns heard, and that developers are then held accountable. I will monitor and ensure that developers comply with the Transportation Sustainability Fee and other Community Benefit fees and pay for their impacts on SF’s transportation system and entire urban ecosystem. This can be ensured in part by revising the Eastern Neighborhoods Plan to cover all District 10 neighborhoods and require developers to pay both Transportation Sustainability and Impact Fees that will fund locally-desired projects to directly benefit our neighborhoods. If developers want to build here, they need to work with our existing communities by demonstrating this minimal level of care and concern for the health of the City instead of just being concerned with their profits.

 

Lastly, I will work with the City to fully fund the Right to Counsel program that was approved by voters last June so all residential tenants facing eviction in San Francisco are provided an attorney. This is an important step towards ending the practice of wrongful evictions in our City and should be prioritized in budget allocations.

 

EASTERN NEIGHBORHOODS PLAN

With all the development happening or coming to District 10 in the near future, it is imperative that our City revisit and revise the current Eastern Neighborhoods Plan (“ENP”). I’m tired of our eastern neighborhood homeowners having to pool personal money together to pay for basic community improvements, and believe the City and developers should be paying for our infrastructure upgrades instead. We need a new plan that will not only cover every District 10 neighborhood, but that will also ensure the City uses the resources brought in from Impact Fees to directly benefit the D10 community where development is occurring.

 

Furthermore, we need to develop a clear, community-driven plan for how to use the dramatic increases in projected Impact Fee income for infrastructure improvements throughout our district. When the Eastern Neighborhoods Plan was originally written, it was projected that these fees would bring in only $24.7 million over the next 5 years. This projection nearly doubled to $43.7 million in 2011, jumped to $53.7 million by 2013, and, in the last IPIC Annual Report published in 2016, has gone up to over $79 million. It is now projected that fees from the Eastern Neighborhoods Plan will total over $130.5 million by 2021, which would be roughly 36% of all Impact Fees collected by the City within that time frame combined. Despite these increases, the San Francisco Controller’s Office only recorded $3,098 in expenditures from the Eastern Neighborhood’s Public Benefits Fund between the Plan’s approval in 2009 and 2012. This kind of slow movement is unacceptable and precisely why it is imperative that District 10’s next Supervisor have a proven record of successfully bringing resources directly to projects and programs that benefit our residents.

 

In addition, any revised Eastern Neighborhoods Plan should include a stop-gap measure to ensure that funds collected from Impact Fees are used to improve District 10’s infrastructure and support the population growth. If we haven’t seen sufficient public transit, schools, parks, and other infrastructure added to our neighborhoods within a set period of years, then actions should be taken to remedy the situation before any more development occurs. As stated in my Public Transit / Public Infrastructure policy - it does the City little good to grow our population without simultaneously making changes to accommodate our residents comfortably. If developers want to build in our neighborhoods, they need to work with our existing residents by demonstrating this minimal level of care and concern for the health of the City instead of just being concerned with their profits.

 

Lastly, I would like to see the Eastern Neighborhoods Plan incorporate a requirement that developers partner with Local Builders for portions of their approved projects. This would ensure there are people, organizations, and/or companies involved who are actually part of the local community. Several developers currently working on projects in District 10 are bound by Agreements that include this requirement, and, through my experience being brought into a project for this purpose, I know that it helps ensure the majority of jobs in designing, construction, and financing are given to local residents. Furthermore, as a local building partner, my organization was able to bring 12 certificate of preference holders (COP), all of whom were Black families who had moved to neighboring cities, back to the City by securing them affordable housing. We made sure that over 50% of the new residents were African-Americans from the community, and, when the developer we had partnered with began unilaterally raising rent on residents, were in a position to work to hold them accountable and publicly express our belief that this was unacceptable.

 

COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT

Even with revising the requirements for Community Benefit Agreements and Impact Fees in the Eastern Neighborhoods Plan, experience has shown us that this does not automatically result in projects or services that our communities actually want or need. Far too often, people from outside our neighborhoods have held community meetings to hear input from our residents but then proceeded however they wanted to anyway. Particularly given the high rate of residents being priced out of their homes within District 10 and San Francisco’s Black community, it is crucial that our residents be involved in every step of incoming developments and in determining the corresponding community benefit projects.

 

I firmly believe that zoning should remain in the hands of the local leadership and community because we are the ones affected by the impact that development has on our environment and infrastructure. There is a balance that can and must be struck between community benefits and increasing our housing supply, and, if we want to solve the housing crisis, it is imperative we work towards achieving that balance rather than simply stake out positions on either side of the issues. I believe that this starts with active community involvement in revising the Eastern Neighborhoods Plan. As Supervisor, I will make sure that when we talk, they listen downtown. If they decide not to listen, we will call hearings to make sure that they focus on what we need to do and get accomplished right away. Residents of the southeast will not be ignored by City Hall during my tenure as Supervisor.

 

However, we also need a strategy to increase resident involvement in the Eastern Neighborhoods Community Advisory Committee (CAC). This is the body that advises the City on how to prioritize proposed community improvements and use the money brought in by Impact Fees, however, their meetings are currently all held in the evening outside of District 10. Given all the transportation and transit issues in the southeast, and particularly the evening hour switch-backs on the T-line, this is completely unacceptable. The Committee cannot successfully provide input on how to prioritize Public Benefits, relay information about the status of development proposals to community members, or provide input on development monitoring efforts when our residents cannot even make it to the meetings. As Supervisor, I would push for these meetings to be relocated to a rotating schedule within each of the District 10 neighborhoods, as well as for additional meetings to be held within our communities with Committee members as needed. Every resident of District 10 who wants to have a voice about our District’s future deserves the opportunity to have one.

 

 

PREVIOUS SUCCESSES

 

  • Worked with colleagues on the Board of Education and Board of Supervisors to create the first educator housing project to help our SFUSD educators stay in San Francisco. It will be built on part of the site at Francis Key Scott Elementary School.

  • Built 59 units of ALL affordable housing for families in District 10 while holding developers responsible for existing community benefit packages supporting walkability, mixed-use, and open space.

  • Currently building another 156 units of ALL affordable housing for families.

  • Successfully brought Neighborhood Certificate of Preference Holders who had been forced out of the City back to the Bayview and into the affordable housing units we built.

  • Worked with HOPE SF to rebuild public housing throughout District 10 and ensure public housing conditions are safe and livable for tenants.

  • Ensured compact, walkable, and mixed-use neighborhoods for public housing residents.

  • Brought and am continuing to ensure each public housing community has job training and career placement services onsite (already exists in Alice Griffith, Sunnydale, Hunters View and now Potrero Hill).

Creating Cleaner, Safer Neighborhoods; Cleaning up the Hunters Point Shipyard

Summary

Safety and cleanliness are top concerns in every neighborhood across District 10. As Supervisor, I will work to solve these issues by providing alternative opportunities for young people, implementing community policing strategies that bridge the gap between our neighbors and law enforcement, and taking concrete steps to decrease the trash and illegal dumping currently plaguing our City’s streets.

 

Cleanup at the Hunters Point ShipyardI lost both of my grandparents to cancer before I was 16 years old, so this issue is personal and not about political points for me and my family. The pollution at the Shipyard is one of the most undeniable cases of environmental racism to ever come to light, and it is time we work together to adequately address and oversee complete re-testing and a thorough, vetted, and responsible clean-up of the entire area.

CLEANER, SAFER STREETS

PUBLIC SAFETY

Safety is a top concern in every District 10 community. Every family deserves to feel safe and secure in their home and neighborhood. To achieve this goal, we must both lower the epidemic levels of petty theft / property crime and make sure that all residents feel safe interacting with our police officers.

 

First we must provide alternatives to crime for residents in San Francisco. Having opportunities gives people the hope needed to understand that violence is unnecessary. The more skills and education an individual has, the better choices they will make - which ultimately leads to more productive lives. Programs that connect residents to jobs and educational opportunities are statistically proven to reduce crime and violence. I have seen first-hand the positive influence a job can have on individuals and the correlated decrease in recidivism that occurs when offenders and people caught in the justice system have work.

 

We must also reduce the amount of negative interactions our youth have with law enforcement to begin with. I’ve been fighting to make sure our young people have opportunities to make decisions that result in less police contact. Right now we’re working on a community safety initiative that connects our young people to careers in the public sector such as in the court system, police department, Sheriff’s Department, Adult probation department, and Public Defender’s office. This type of effort helps the community get to know the people who work in our city and build those relationships.

 

This also speaks to the need for more community-based policing strategies: police attending community events like Little League games, being involved with neighbors on a day-to-day basis, and becoming part of the fabric of our neighborhoods. This strategy works not only because crimes are not committed when police are present, but also because it has been demonstrated that crime is reduced when relationships exist between police and community. When you know somebody’s grandmother, auntie, and uncle, it’s unavoidable that you will have a different relationship with that community. Unfortunately, this doesn’t occur often because a lot of our officers don’t live in our communities anymore. As Supervisor, I would encourage police officers to come into our communities on off-days and advocate for resources to support participation in community activities where they can get to know the people in the neighborhoods they serve. I will be laser-focused on implementing community policing strategies to bridge that gap between our neighbors and law enforcement.

 

Our City should also encourage relationships between police and neighborhoods by not only creating more neighborhood-based substations like the one I recently work with Supervisor Hillary Ronen to open on San Bruno Ave., but by recognizing the unique needs of each community. Prior to the San Bruno substation’s opening, there were no officers in the area who spoke Chinese or regularly walked the beat. Thanks to the new substation, there are now 3-4 Chinese-speaking and Spanish-speaking police officers with local cultural knowledge integrating themselves into that community. As Supervisor, I would advocate for expanding this model of community-based, culturally sensitive policing into additional neighborhoods.

 

STREET CLEANLINESS

There are several steps we can take to decrease the amount of trash and illegal dumping currently plaguing our City’s streets. First, I believe we need to reinstall public trash and recycling cans on every block of neighborhoods with heavy pedestrian traffic, as well as periodically throughout residential neighborhoods. Contrary to the original goal behind removing them, getting rid of public cans has not reduced the amount of waste we produce but instead contributed to the way trash is now strewn across many of our sidewalks, streets, and gutters with no one to clean it up. I believe it is time to reverse this policy.

 

In addition, we can utilize the jobs programs within several of our Navigation Centers to train and employ some of our currently homeless folks so they help keep our City clean while we provide them jobs to help them off the streets. The Department of Public Works currently has a team that works with formerly homeless folks to keep streets clean in the Civic Center and Tenderloin areas, and this is a program we can expand to cover more areas in San Francisco. We should also have the Department of Public Works work with Recology to curb illegal dumping by coordinating neighborhood clean-up days when residents can bring bulk items to a central location for collection.

 

PREVIOUS SUCCESSES

  • Worked with Supervisor Hillary Ronen to open a new police substation focused on community-based policing on San Bruno Ave. This substation brought Chinese and Spanish speaking officers with local cultural knowledge to an area that had previously had no way of communicating with monolingual residents who did not speak English.

  • Spearheaded a documentary (The Chop Shop) that brought the community and law enforcement together to discuss how each viewed the other, potential solutions for bridging the gaps between community and law enforcement, and assisted in developing strategies to address the 272 Department of Justice recommendations for police reform.

  • Led my organization in writing a White Paper listing concrete solutions for police reform.

  • Currently working with the San Francisco Police Department to continue informing strategies that address the 272 recommendations from the Department of Justice around police accountability and Community Policing strategies.

  • Currently working on a community safety initiative to connect our young people with careers in the public sector such as in the court system, police department, Sheriff’s Department, Adult probation department, and Public Defender’s office so that they can get to know the people who work in our city and build those relationships.

 

 

 

CLEAN UP AT THE HUNTER’S POINT SHIPYARD

It has become too common for residents of Bayview Hunters Point (both near and on the Shipyard) to learn additional reasons why they cannot trust or rely on assurances that the land they live on is safe. The SF Chronicle’s article regarding radioactive material recently found on Parcel A - where many residents and families currently live - should be concerning for anyone who cares about this City, and particularly for anyone who knows and loves this community.

 

When I was a child we always knew something wasn’t quite right. I lost both of my grandparents to cancer before I was 16 years old (my grandmother when I was 9 and my grandfather when I was 15), so this is personal and not about political points for me and my family. The sad thing is that my family’s story is common. Every historic Bayview family has been somehow affected by the travesty at the Hunters Point Shipyard similarly to how mine has.

 

Even though the southeastern part of San Francisco has always been disproportionately affected by environmental injustice, the Shipyard is one of the most undeniable cases of environmental racism that has ever come to light. The reality is that the situation here, the subsequent fraud, and the ongoing health problems our community has faced are civil rights issues. It is time to adequately address a complete re-testing and thorough, vetted and accountable clean-up of the Shipyard.

 

Tetra Tech and the Navy will be held responsible and the community certainly deserves to be compensated for pain and suffering and the cost of related medical expenses, but we also deserve to stop being the subject of false promises. That is precisely why I have been in ongoing talks with the San Francisco City Attorney to investigate litigation against Tetra Tech, explore the appropriate criminal punishment, and develop the kinds of longer term, lasting-impact legal strategy that will hold the Navy and other parties accountable. We simply must ensure that this kind of environmental racism never occurs in our community again.

 

As for the short term, there is little that anyone disagrees on:

 

  1. The development on the Shipyard, including on Parcel A, must be halted until the entire area has been thoroughly re-tested by a new third party.

 

  1. Tetra Tech cannot be allowed near the re-testing process, must be held accountable, and should have to pay for every dime of retesting and remaining cleanup.

 

  1. Since we have been repeatedly let down by the Navy, multiple government agencies, and the contractors they brought in, and there is no entity currently involved that has any credibility left. It is therefore imperative that we, as a community, collectively move towards bringing in new parties that do not have a conflict. I have previously suggested that the City should bring in academia (UC Berkeley, etc.) to participate in the actual testing of radioactive toxins on the Shipyard, have explored this idea with the City Attorney, and I still believe this is the best step. Academia does not have the same conflict of interests we have seen from the government entities who have lost community trust. These institutions of higher education have the resources and teams to do the job well. Most importantly, however, they have the best chance at regaining community trust.

 

  1. The re-testing process should not occur behind closed doors whenever the anticipation of litigation does not require discretion. That is why, as Supervisor, I plan to convene a task force that would monitor and oversee the re-testing of the entire Shipyard, including Parcel A, and ensure that all testing goes further than only surface-level soil. This task force should include members of the community living in the area, the Supervisor, members of the health and environmental departments, the EPA, and be open to the public.

 

We must treat this as we would any other civil rights and social justice issue and no longer allow the forces of division, political posturing, or quick profit keep us separated while there are people afraid the land they live on is poisoning their families, friends, and community. If there is any issue on which Bayview residents should be absolutely and unequivocally united, it is that our voices should be heard, considered, and involved in every step of the clean up process until testing and the clean up is complete.

 

As Supervisor, I am absolutely committed to ensuring this transparency and accountability, and guarantee that I will stand up to anyone or any corporation that threatens the health and vibrancy of our community in District 10. It is only by working together that we can not only ensure the pollution at the Shipyard is responsibly cleaned up, but also that our community never has to face this kind of environmental catastrophe again.

 

PREVIOUS SUCCESSES

 

  • Trained over 150 District 10 residents in environmental remediation careers and provided them certifications in lead and asbestos abatement, hazardous waste removal, mold awareness, confined space, OSHA 10 Safety and CPR - which made them Certified Environmental Technicians.

  • Placed over one hundred District 10 residents in jobs and careers that remove hazardous waste materials and provided them opportunities to conduct clean-up and remediation in their own communities.

Videos (1)

First 100 Days and Policy Platform Release Press Conference — October 12, 2018 Shamann Walton for District 10 Supervisor

Announcing our first 100 Days Plan with the support of Supervisor Sandra Lee Fewer and former Supervisor Sophie Maxwell.

 

We're proud to release a comprehensive plan for tackling District 10's major issues in the long term, as well as also a clear-cut plan on how we will take action on our priorities from day one.

 

We are ready and eager to get to work building bridges and community so that we can start solving the problems that face District 10's neighborhoods together!

 

View or download our entire policy platform at https://shamannwalton.com/vision/

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