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November 6, 2018 — California General Election
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Special District

Allan Hancock Joint Community College District
Measure Y2018 - 55% Approval Required

To learn more about measures, follow the links for each tab in this section. For most screenreaders, you can hit Return or Enter to enter a tab and read the content within.

Election Results

Failed

29,245 votes yes (48.2%)

31,403 votes no (51.8%)

100% of precincts reporting (131/131).

41 ballots counted.

To upgrade educational facilities/provide 21st Century technology to affordably prepare local students for jobs/university transfer, update classrooms/labs for career training in public safety, design, computer graphics, theatrical arts; acquire, construct, repair classrooms, facilities, sites/equipment, shall this Allan Hancock Joint Community College District measure to issue $75,000,000 in bonds, at legal rates/replace bonds authorized in 2006, levy 1.1 cents/$100 assessed value, $2,900,000 annually while bonds are outstanding be approved, with oversight, audits, no administrators' salaries?

What is this proposal?

Measure Details — Official information about this measure

Impartial analysis / Proposal

Santa Barbara County Counsel

This measure was placed on the ballot by the Board of Trustees of the Allan Hancock Joint Community College District, which is the governing board of the District.

If approved by 55% of the voters voting on the proposition, this measure would authorize the District to issue and sell bonds of up to $75,000,000 in aggregate principal amount, at legal rates, to provide financing for the specific college facilities projects listed in the District’s Project List. The Project List, as well as the full text of the measure, are printed in the voter information guide. None of the proceeds from the sale of bonds may be used for teacher or administrator salaries or operating expenses.

The bonds and interest thereon would be payable from property taxes levied on taxable property in the District. These taxes would be in addition to the property taxes currently levied on taxpayers in the District; however, the measure, if approved, provides for cancellation of the District’s remaining Measure I2006 bond authorization. The amount of the increased taxes each year would depend upon the amount needed to pay the principal and interest on the bonds. The District’s estimate of the final fiscal year in which the tax is anticipated to be collected is 2049-2050.

The bond measure includes the following accountability requirements:

          A. A requirement that the proceeds from the bond sale be used only for the above purposes and not for any other purpose, including teacher and administrator salaries, and other college operating expenses.

          B. A list of the specific college facilities projects to be funded and certification that the college district board has evaluated safety, class size reduction and information technology needs in developing that list.

          C. A requirement that the college district board conduct an annual, independent performance audit to ensure that the funds have been spent only on the specific college facilities projects listed in the Project List.

          D. A requirement that the college district board conduct an annual, independent financial audit of the proceeds from the sale of the bonds until all of such proceeds have been spent for the college facilities projects listed in the Project List.

          E. If the measure is approved, the District Board of Trustees will also establish an independent citizens’ oversight committee to ensure bond proceeds are used only to fund the specific projects listed in the Project List, as printed in the voter information guide.

/s/ Michael C. Ghizzoni County Counsel July 26, 2018

Tax rate

President/Superintendent, Allan Hancock Joint Community College District

              An election will be in the Allan Hancock Joint Community College District (the "District") on November 6, 2018, to authorize the sale of up to $75,000,000 in bonds of the District to finance school facilities as described in the proposition. If the bonds are approved, the District expects to sell the bonds in multiple series. Principal and interest on the bonds will be payable from the process of tax levies made upon the taxable property in the District. The information regarding tax rates is provided to comply with Section 9401 of the Election Code of the State of California. This information is based upon the best estimates and projections presently available from official sources, upon experience within the District and other demonstrable factors.

              Based upon the foregoing and projections of the assessed valuations of taxable property in the District, and assuming the entire debt service, including principal and interest on the bonds, will be paid through property taxation:

              1. The best estimate from official sources of the average annual tax rate that would be required to be levied to fund that bond issue over the entire duration of the bond debt service, based on assessed valuations available at the time of the election or a projection based on experience within the same jurisdiction or other demonstrable factors is 1.1 cents/$100 of assessed valuation ($11/$100,000) of all property to be taxed. The best estimate of the final fiscal year in which the tax is anticipated to be collected is 2049-2050.

              2. The best estimate from official sources of the highest tax rate that would be required to be levied to fund that bond issue, and an estimate of the year in which that rate will apply, based on assessed valuations available at the time of the election or a projection based on experience within the same jurisdiction or other demonstrable factors is 1.1 cents/$100 of assessed valuation ($11/$100,000) of all property to be taxed.

              3. The best estimate from official sources of the total debt service, including the principal and interest, that would be required to be repaid if all the bonds are issued and sold is $142,543,028.

              The attention of all voters is directed to the fact that the foregoing information is based upon projections and estimates only. The actual tax rates and the years in which they will apply may vary from those presently estimated due to variations from these estimates in the timing of bond sales, the amount of bonds sold, and the market interest rates at the time of the sales, and the actual assessed valuations over the term of repayment of the bonds. The date of sale and the amount of bonds sold any given time will be determined by the District based on its need for construction funding as well as other factors. The actual interest rates at which the bonds will be sold will depend on bond market conditions at the time of sale. Actual assessed valuations at future dates will depend upon the amount and value of taxable property within the District as determined by the County Assessor in the County of Santa Barbara, County of San Luis Obispo, and County of Ventura in the annual assessment and the equalization process. Accordingly, the actual tax rate and the years in which such rates are applicable may vary from those presently estimated above.

/s/ Kevin G. Walthers, Ph.D., President/Superintendent, Allan Hancock Joint Community College District Dated: 6/21/18 

Published Arguments — Arguments for and against the ballot measure

Arguments FOR

   Vote YES on Measure Y for Allan Hancock College – a modern campus for a modern workforce. 
   Measure Y will allow Hancock to:

  • Build state-of-the-art classrooms
  • Expand technology-focused and career education training programs
  • Prepare students for high-demand and high-wage 21st-century careers
  • Strengthen job training in areas such as science, technology, engineering and    mathematics     (STEM),      healthcare, agriculture, public safety, graphic design, and sports medicine. Measure Y will allow Hancock to continue fueling the community’s economic engine by enhancing modern skills for the modern workforce.

 

   Nearly half of the buildings on Hancock’s Santa Maria campus were built more than 50 years ago. Thanks to a robust maintenance program, the buildings lasted well past their useful life. On the south end of the district, Measure Y supports expansion of career education and public safety programs in Lompoc and the Santa Ynez Valley.

   Measure Y will allow Hancock to replace unsafe and obsolete buildings, labs and facilities to provide optimal learning environments for the most in-demand classes, such as sports medicine, law enforcement, graphic design, PCPA, and STEM programs.

   Measure Y will also protect access to local, affordable higher education. With 17 years as the state’s top transfer institution to Cal Poly, Hancock has a proven track record of preparing local students for four-year degrees and promising careers.

   Measure Y allows Hancock to provide affordable, quality higher education for students and working families throughout our community.

   Taxpayer accountability and transparency measures are built into Measure Y, including:

  • An Independent Citizens Oversight Committee;
  • All funds from the bond measure must be spent locally;
  • Annual Fiscal Audits; and
  • Not one penny of the bond can be used for administrator, staff or faculty salaries. 

   Please join us and your neighbors in supporting Measure Y for Allan Hancock College.

   The undersigned author(s) of the Argument in Favor of ballot measure Y2018 at the Allan Hancock Joint Community College District for the general election to be held on November 6, 2018, hereby state that such argument is true and correct to the best of their knowledge and belief.

/s/ Kevin Walthers 7/30/18
President, Allan Hancock College  

/s/ Jim Glines 7/30/18
Businessman  

/s/ The Honorable Steve Lavagnino 7/31/18
Santa Barbara County County Supervisor  

/s/ Ann Foxworthy Lewellan 7/30/18
Retired, President, Allan Hancock College  

/s/ The Honorable Hilda Zacarias 7/30/18
Trustee, Allan Hancock College

— Santa Barbara County Clerk, Recorder, and Assessor and Registrar of Voters

Arguments AGAINST

What does “replace bonds authorized in 2006” mean? Where is it described? What is District hiding? Can you trust District?

That’s enough for a big NO on Measure Y2018!

Has District actually delivered on its promises?

Why waste your money on vague, unenforceable promises?

Don’t be deceived by District’s campaign, funded by businesses that will likely benefit from bond money. (Isn’t that called pay-to-play?) Beware of high-priced marketers masquerading as “parents, instructors, and community leaders.”

Why Vote No on Measure Y2018?

- It’s virtually, word-for-word, identical to every other bond measure written by lawyers and advisors who travel California tempting districts with a pot of gold – at handsome profits, of course.

- Did you hear about a list of projects? Why isn’t there a list of SPECIFIC projects in Measure Y2018? Because it would restrict District to spend money ONLY on those things?

- Were you surveyed? Did you get a campaign mailer from District? YOU PAID for it all. Is that fair? Using your money for campaign purposes?

- Would you purchase a home or car without knowing details? If Measure Y2018 passes, only guarantee is that you will pay estimated $200,000,000 in taxes and District will spend the money. On what? District will decide after money’s in the bank.

Proposition 39 permits a bare majority of voters (55%) to approve these bonds. “To ensure that BEFORE they vote, voters will be given a list of specific projects their bond money will be used for,” it requires that Measure Y2018 be a “list of the specific school facilities projects to be funded.” (Source: Proposition 39 ballot measure.)

Measure Y2018’s intentionally vague language gives District a BLANK CHECK with NO ACCOUNTABILITY.

Don’t throw your money away on intentionally vague, unenforceable promises.

Want more evidence of District’s deception? http://bit.ly/NoAHCBond

The undersigned author(s) of the Argument Against ballot measure Y2018 at the Allan Hancock Joint Community College District for the general election to be held on November 6, 2018, hereby state that such argument is true and correct to the best of his/her/their knowledge and belief.

/s/ Dan Hilker 7/29/18
Allan Hancock College Employee (Retired)  

/s/ Ross Ruth 7/28/18
Allan Hancock College Part-Time Faculty Member  

/s/ Todd Miller 7/27/18
Parent of Allan Hancock College Students  

/s/ Byron Moles 7/27/18
President, Santa Maria Brewing Company  

/s/ Karen Moles 7/27/18
Vice President, Santa Maria Brewing Company

— Santa Barbara County Clerk, Recorder, and Assessor and Registrar of Voters

Replies to Arguments FOR

Let’s talk law. Law says Measure I could tax you $25 per $100,000 maximum. Why is your tax rate $23.50 with $34,230,867.50 unissued? District spent like drunken sailors. It issued CABs (capital appreciation bonds, like those in Poway Unified scandal) THREE TIMES! Law prohibits it from issuing more bonds.

Constitution prohibits operating costs like “basic repairs,” “fiscal reporting,” facility master plan preparation.”

NO ADMINISTRATOR SALARIES?
Constitution says no salaries. Statutes say no salaries. Resolution, question, measure, and argument say no salaries. Guess what lawyers sneaked in? Hint: “reimburse the District for the cost of District staff.” Salaries will be paid. You can take that to the bank.

PENSIONS?
Shifting salaries and operating costs to bonds means more money for extravagant pensions.

OVERSIGHT?
Have you ever seen expenditure reports from Measure I?
Good stewardship? It’s all fake news.

FACTS
Lawyers and advisors made $2,780,294 (payable by you, with interest) from facilities bonds issued since 2005. It’s a contract. Have you read the fine print? Besides District salaries, what else does it pay for? – “performing arts,” “field lights,” “press box,” and on and on.
District’s spent $134,997,103 since 2006 from Measure I.
Why are you buying Measure I promises again?

BOTTOM LINE
Can you trust District? When you’re not looking, will District breach law, its promises, and your trust?
Would you really agree to a written contract where promises weren’t explicitly and unambiguously written into it?
You’re being deceived! Don’t sign a blank check. Vote NO!
Learn more: http://bit.ly/NoAHCBond

The undersigned author(s) of the Rebuttal to the Argument in Favor of ballot measure Y2018 at the Allan Hancock Joint Community College District for the general election to be held on November 6, 2018, hereby state that such argument is true and correct to the best of their knowledge and belief.

/s/ Dan Hilker
Allan Hancock College Employee (Retired)
8/1/18 

/s/ Ross Ruth
Allan Hancock College Part Time Faculty Member
8/1/18
/s/ Todd M. Miller 
Parent of Allan Hancock College Student
8/9/18
/s/ Byron Moles
President Santa Maria Brewing Co
8/10/18

/s/ Karen Moles
Vice President Santa Maria Brewing Co
8/1/18

— Santa Barbara County Clerk, Recorder, and Assessor and Registrar of Voters

Replies to Arguments AGAINST

 

As local citizens and volunteer committee members, we are disappointed by the inaccurate and intentionally deceptive language contained in the “against” argument. Allan Hancock College is the premier provider of affordable, quality education in our region and we have been honored to support the college with our own time and resources. Above all, Allan Hancock College has been a mindful steward of our resources.

It is without question that the college properly managed Measure I funds. This is reflected by our Citizen Oversight Committee and independent, external audits. College leadership refinanced existing bonds three times over the past five years, providing a savings of $12 million to local taxpayers. All of the savings went to taxpayers - no additional funds accrued to the college.

Measure Y addresses core issues for our community and will create a modern, high-tech campus for our students.

When you support Measure Y, you support a college that:

·    is meeting its mission with record numbers of graduates;

·    is financially sound with excellent reserves and fully funded pension liabilities; and,

·    is properly managed, allocating more than $5m each year for maintenance of our capital facilities.

The Aspen institute continues to identify the college as one of the top schools, not just in California, but in the entire nation. A vote for Measure Y is a vote to continue providing high-quality degrees that lead to good jobs, transfer to four-year colleges and a better workforce for our community.

The undersigned author(s) of the Rebuttal to the Argument Against ballot measure Y2018 at the general election for the Allan Hancock Joint Community College District to be held on November 6, 2018, hereby state that such argument is true and correct to the best of his/her/their knowledge and belief.

/s/ Alice Patino                                                        
Mayor, City of Santa Maria
8/9/18
/s/ Inri Serrano
Student Trustee, Allan Hancock College
8/9/18
/s/ Judy Frost
Retired, Managing Director, PCPA/Allan Hancock College
8/9/18

/s/ Mario Juarez
Attorney at Law
8/9/18
/s/ Mark Evans
Businessman
8/9/18 

 

— Santa Barbara County Clerk, Recorder, and Assessor and Registrar of Voters

Read the proposed legislation

Proposed legislation

FULL TEXT OF THIS MEASURE IS IN YOUR COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA SAMPLE BALLOT.

YOUR SAMPLE BALLOT MAY BE FOUND HERE: http://www.sbcvote.com/SampleballotandpollplaceLookup/

 

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