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November 6, 2018 — California General Election
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Local

City of Garden Grove
Measure O - Majority Approval Required

To learn more about measures, follow the links for each tab in this section. For most screenreaders, you can hit Return or Enter to enter a tab and read the content within.

Election Results

Passed

27,306 votes yes (64.5%)

15,024 votes no (35.5%)

100% of precincts reporting (61/61).

If adopted, would establish a one-cent (1%) transactions and use (sales) tax on the sale of all tangible personal property sold at retail in the City, whose revenues may be used for general governmental purposes of the City, including provision of effective 9-1-1- emergency response, preventing cuts to police/firefighter/paramedic staffing levels, neighborhood police patrols, gang/drug prevention, protect local drinking water supplies, repair streets/potholes, address homelessness, support affordable housing options, and protect vital city services.

What is this proposal?

Measure Details — Official information about this measure

YES vote means

yes vote is a vote in favor of authorizing the city to enact a 1 percent sales tax to fund general municipal purposes.

NO vote means

no vote is a vote against authorizing the city to enact a 1 percent sales tax to fund general municipal purposes.

Impartial analysis / Proposal

Garden Grove City Attorney

Measure O, the “Garden Grove Public Safety/9-1-1 and Vital City Services Measure” seeks voter approval at the November 6, 2018, General Election of an ordinance enacting a one-cent (1%) transactions and use tax locally in the City of Garden Grove. A “transactions and use tax” is commonly known as a “sales tax.” Sales taxes are not a tax on homes or properties. Sales taxes are applied to purchases (except for food purchased as groceries or prescription medication). Out of town shoppers visiting Garden Grove will also share in the cost.

This sales tax would be a general tax, meaning that revenues raised from the tax would go into the City’s general fund and may be used for general governmental purposes of the City, including 9-1-1 emergency response, police, firefighter and paramedic services, street repairs, gang/drug abuse prevention, addressing homelessness and other city services. The City would not be required to use the revenues raised by the measure for any special purpose. The measure is intended to prevent significant cuts to general City services such as those mentioned above, resulting from revenue shortfalls caused by recent economic factors, unfunded mandates, and Sacramento financial takeaways.

Revenue and Taxation Code section 7285.9 authorizes the City to levy a local transactions and use/sales tax at a rate of one percent (one cent) so long as the tax is approved by two-thirds of the City Council and by a majority of the voters voting in an election on that issue. If approved, the sales tax would become effective on April 1, 2019.

The tax would be paid in addition to current sales taxes and would be collected at the same time and in the same manner as existing sales taxes. By law, all revenues raised by the measure would belong to the City of Garden Grove and could not be taken by, or shared with, the State or any other agency. If approved, the measure would impose a City tax that would add one cent to the cost of a $1.00 item purchased in Garden Grove. The City estimates that the proposed sales tax will generate an additional $19 million annually, but the actual amounts raised will vary based on the level of retail sales occurring in Garden Grove.

The measure requires the City Council to appoint a Citizen’s Oversight Committee to review and report on the revenue and expenditure from funds raised by the measure.

A “yes” vote on Measure O will authorize the one cent (1%) sales tax.

A “no” vote on Measure O will not authorize the sales tax.

   
—Garden Grove City Attorney[1]

 

Published Arguments — Arguments for and against the ballot measure

Arguments FOR

 

Garden Grove is an amazing community with an excellent quality Of life — and we're working to keep it that way! Vote YES on O protect our local quality of life!

We all live in Garden Grove because we enjoy better services than nearby communities. Measure O keeps our tax dollars local -- ensuring that Garden Grove can maintain our excellent public safety, 9-1-1 emergency responses, and other services that keep Garden Grove special. Vote YES!

Sacramento politicians have taken millions of OUR taxpayer dollars to solve their own problems. Enough is enough! Vote YES on O to keep OUR taxpayer dollars local, for OUR community's services.

YES on O protects life-saving, 911 public safety services. The American Heart Association says brain deterioration starts just six minutes after someone stops breathing. Seconds count in emergency situations. Vote YES on O so our city can hire more paramedics for any Garden Grove resident or family who needs emergency medical response.

YES on O keep Garden Grove neighborhoods safe. Measure O keeps our money LOCAL -- helping our police department maintain the local neighborhood police patrols that keep gangs and drug dealers from nearby communities out Of our City. Vote YES on XXX and keep our neighborhoods safe!

Over 40% of Garden Grove's Streets and roads are in fair-to-very-poor condition. Well-maintained streets, clean neighborhoods and parks, all maintain our strong property values — vote YES on O!

YES on O continues Garden Grove's high standards for accountability and transparency, including independent citizen's oversight, independent audits, and yearly reports back to the community. Best of all, Yes on O keeps our tax dollars local — Sacramento can't touch one cent of Yes on O funds.

Join Garden Grove's homeowners, taxpayers, community leaders and public safety officials in voting YES on O,

The following individuals signed the official argument in favor of the measure:

  • Kathy Ladd, real estate professional
  • Brian Dalton, president, Garden Grove Police Association
  • Victor Gomez, businessman
  • Jack Wallin, charter member, GG Strawberry Festival Association
  • Christy Lihn Lee, member, Vietnamese American Youth Organization

 

 

— Ballotpedia

Arguments AGAINST

In 2010, voters in Garden Grove overwhelmingly supported a bond measure placed on the ballot by the Garden Grove Unified School District. Voters could see that the school district had done its homework. The district explained the need for infrastructure improvements, and detailed how the use of the additional property taxes it was proposing would be restricted, and not used for operating expenses. Today, we can see for ourselves the numerous improvements at school sites throughout the district.

This measure is not that smart. It reads like a laundry list of scare tactics. It whines about state revenue streams that have dried up, as if there was no possible way to have foreseen such events. Worst of all, perhaps, is that passing this measure would send the wrong message to a lazy city council. Do they look at the support for the school district's measure and wonder just how much more we're willing to pay? Send them back to the drawing board. Vote NO on increasing the sales tax.

 

The following individuals signed the official argument against the measure:

  • Paul Marsden
— Ballotpedia

Read the proposed legislation

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