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League of Women Voters of California Education Fund
California Common Cause@CommonCauseCA
November 8, 2016 — Elección General de California
Local

Ciudad de BerkeleyCandidato para Consejo Municipal, Distrito 5

Photo de Stephen Murphy

Stephen Murphy

Family Justice Advocate
3,502 votos (37.5%)
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Mis 3 prioridades principales

  • Business sustainability is the engine of economic growth. I’ll work to create economically lively neighborhoods with city support for small business viability.
  • To address our critical housing shortage, I’ll work for denser green development as smart growth in transit corridors and create environmental benefits by enabling residents to reduce their carbon footprint.
  • I propose a compassionate, holistic, long-term regional system to address the core issues that cause homelessness, one that follows a "housing-first model" that's case-management focused, and also increased city funding for more resources.

Experiencia

Experiencia

Profesión:Associate Director County Agency; Attorney
Associate Director, Alameda County Family Justice Center, (2015–current)
Adjunct Professor of Ethics and Domestic Violence Law, University of San Francisco School of Law (2013–current)
Chair, Berkeley Planning Commission — Cargo designado (2013–current)
Commissioner, former Vice Chair, Berkeley's Commission on the Status of Women — Cargo designado (2011–current)
Development, Capital Campaign Of The Berkeley Food And Housing Project
 — Cargo elegido (2015–current)
Board Member, Where Little Acorns Grow (Committee to save Oaks Theatre on Solano Avenue in Berkeley) — Cargo designado (2015–current)
Managing Partner and founder, MVTC Law, LLC (2003–2015)
Chair, Alameda County Bar Association Family Law Executive Committee
 — Cargo elegido (2010–2011)
Housing Attorney defending unlawful detainer evictions, Bay Area Legal Aid (2002–2003)

Educación

UNIVERSITY OF SAN FRANCISCO SCHOOL OF LAW Juris Doctorate, Public Interest Law Award from University of San Francisco (2001)
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, BERKELEY Bachelors Degree Honors, , Double Major in Religious Studies and History; NCAA Full Four Year Baseball Scholarship (1995)

Actividades comunitarias

Board Member, The Berkeley Democratic Club (2013–current)
Development, Capital Campaign, Berkeley Food & Housing Proj
ect, tasked with raising $3Million to provide housing and services to Berkeley's homeless population (2015–current)
Board Member, Where Little Acorns Grow (Committee to save Oaks Theatre on Solano Avenue in Berkeley) (2015–current)
Chair, ALAMEDA COUNTY BAR ASSOCIATION FAMILY LAW EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. (2010–2011)

¿Quién apoya a este candidato?

Featured Endorsements

  • Vice Mayor And District 1 Councilmember Linda Maio
  • George Perezvelez, Chair Police Review Commission
  • Erin Rhoades, Executive Director, Berkeley Public Schools Fund

Organizaciónes (10)

  • The International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers – Local 595
  • The United Brotherhood of Carpenters – Local 713
  • SEIU Local 1021
  • The Alameda Labor Council AFL-CIO
  • The Berkeley Police Association
  • The Berkeley Fire Fighters Assocation
  • League of Conservation Voters of the East Bay
  • The Berkeley Democratic Club
  • The Asian Pacific American Democratic Caucus of Alameda County
  • The Building & Construction Trades Council of Alameda County

Funcionarios electos (5)

  • State Senator Loni Hancock
  • State Assembly Member Nancy Skinner
  • District 5 Councilmember Laurie Capitelli
  • Mayor Tom Bates
  • Beatriz Leyva-Cutler, President, Berkeley School Board

Individuos (196)

  • BART Board Director Rebecca Saltzman
  • Judy Appel, Berkeley School Board
  • Josh Daniels, Berkeley School Board
  • Karen Hemphill, Berkeley School Board
  • District 2 Councilmember Darryl Moore
  • District 8 Councilmember Lori Droste
  • District 6 Councilmember Susan Wengraf
  • Carole Norris, Berkeley Housing Authority Chair
  • Susie Medak, Berkeley Rep Managing Director
  • Barry Fike
  • John Fike
  • Harry Pollack, Former President, Congregation Beth El
  • Carole Norris, Berkeley Housing Authority Chair
  • Dmitry Veligurov
  • Duffy Ross
  • Mara Melandry
  • Carlos Babij
  • Sabina Aurilio
  • Ethan Cheng
  • Chris Hudson
  • Michael Alvarez-Cohen
  • Sheila Ring
  • Denis Ring
  • Judy Gonzalez-Massih
  • Tom Linder
  • Tom Curran
  • Caresse Fernandez
  • Herb Behrstock
  • John McGuire
  • Phong Tran
  • Christian Marsh
  • Robert Cady
  • Marie Newton
  • Paul Murphy
  • Nga Hoang
  • Janet Hagopian
  • Renee Revolorio Keith
  • Michael Sedloff
  • Lucy Sundelson
  • Dale Freeman
  • James Whitty
  • Matt Lefer
  • Jennifer Cronin
  • Lisa Locke
  • Debbie Sanderson
  • Nancy Rader
  • Jim Samuels
  • Steven Donaldson
  • Greg Lunkes
  • Karen Borst-Rothe
  • Tom Fike
  • Matt Seuferer
  • Linda Della
  • Rafael Maldonado
  • Marianne (Wilma) Wyss
  • David Snippen
  • Michael Smart
  • Jack Kurzweil
  • Evelyn Larsen
  • John Spitzer
  • Graham Chilsholm
  • Denise Jackson
  • Fred Schecter
  • Lessly Field
  • Alex Maldonado
  • Robert Collier
  • John Smith
  • Robert Smith
  • Thao Dang
  • Dinh Bui
  • Nguyet Tran
  • Anh Dinh
  • Junichi Miyazaki
  • Nancy Thomas
  • Bill Springer
  • Nick Gross
  • Elisabeth Jewel
  • Steven Goldin
  • Colin Elbasani
  • Leah Kirsch
  • Ryan Lau
  • Mavis Delacroix
  • Cynthia Chapman
  • Mary Willet
  • Steve Solnit
  • Maryann Sargent
  • Greg Magofna
  • Ali Kashani
  • Peggy Lee Scott
  • Radha Seshagiri
  • Alan Meier, Scientist
  • Sharon Rudnick
  • Jaimie Levin
  • Ann Slobod
  • Anand Maharati, Dentist
  • Ann Slobod, Business Manager
  • Charles Kahn, Architect
  • David Ritvo, Physician
  • Ryen Bani-Hashemi, UC Berkeley Student
  • David Trachtenberg, Architect
  • Joe DeCredico, Architect 
  • Timothy Gray, Career Placement, UC Berkeley
  • Pamela Gray, Goodwill Director of Donations
  • Mark Rhoades, Planner
  • Isaiah Roter, Attorney
  • Kathrina Ostrander
  • Cherri Allison
  • Megha Rajput, Director of Operations, Clinton Reilly Holdings
  • Loan Vu, Office Manager
  • Giao Vu, Medical Doctor/OBGYN
  • Laura Murphy, School Teacher
  • Jennifer Powell, Accountant
  • Amanda Monchamp, Attorney
  • Dave Borders, Attorney
  • Paul Schwartz, Attorney
  • Lory Ishii, Attorney
  • Dara Lahav, Attorney
  • Dmitri Belser, Executive Director, Center for Accessible Technology
  • Wasan Romsaitong, PG&E Engineer
  • Sarah Nguyen, Marketing Communications Manager
  • Justin K. Nguyen, Medical Resident
  • Chris King, Cleantech Entrepreneur
  • Thien Huong Tran Le, Account Tehnician
  • Tim Bui, Architect
  • Tram Nguyen, Social Worker
  • Emily Borders, Highwire PR Principal
  • Joe DeCredico, Architect
  • Monalisa Vu, USF Associate Professor
  • Geoffrey Lomax
  • Kava Massih, Principal Architect
  • Tom Beil, Architect
  • Ban A. Vu, Medical Doctor
  • Katie Gladstein, Consultant
  • Anna Bellomo, Real Estate Agent
  • George Ishii, Start-Up Advisor
  • Long Giao Vu, Resident, MD
  • Raymond Williams, University of California Accountant
  • Kim Williams
  • David Shiver, Principal, BAE Urban Economics, Inc.
  • Hongvilay Thongsamouth, Partner at MVTC Family Law, LLP
  • Trina Chatterjee, Partner at MVTC Family Law, LLP
  • Somnath Chatterjee, Partner at Morrison Foerster, LLP
  • Thuy S. Nguen, Providence Engineers Adminstrator
  • Tim Q. Nguyen, Environmental Engineer
  • Laverne Lovell, Lovell's Flowers Owner
  • George Lovell, Lovell's Flowers Owner
  • Tan D. Au, Verizon Consultant
  • Jonathan Stern, Berkeley Resident
  • Nancy Yep
  • Ray Yep
  • Karen Rice
  • Clay Shentrup
  • Kad Smith
  • George Perezvelez, Chair Police Review Commission
  • Peter Jan Honigsberg, Law Professor, USF School of Law
  • Karen Bowen, Tax Attorney
  • Christian Marsh, Attorney
  • Phong Tran, Attorney
  • Joe Lahav, Attorney
  • Lynn Murphy, Attorney
  • Christopher Newton, Attorney
  • Christopher Murphy, News Reporter
  • Peter Levitt, Owner Saul's Restaurant
  • Elizabeth Echols, Former State Assemby Candidate
  • Noah Alper, Noah's Bagels
  • Roberta Brooks, Former Aid to Barbara Lee and Ron Dellums
  • Richard Thomason, Former Transportation and Community Health Commissioner
  • Pamela Doolan, Former Berkeley School Board President
  • Karen Chapple, City & Regional Planning Professor U.C. Berkeley
  • Sachu Constantine, Director of Policy, Center for Sustainable Energy
  • Jim Novosel, Vice Chair Board of Library Trustees
  • Julie Holcomb, President, Board of Library Trustees
  • Michele Lawrence, Former Berkeley Unified School District Superintendent
  • Julie Sinai, Former Berkeley School Board Member
  • Chip Harley, Berkeley Resident and Small Businessowner
  • Piero Martinucci, Neighborhood Activist
  • Jill Martinucci, Neighborhood Activist
  • Laurie Furstenfeld
  • Barbara Marienthal
  • Lisa Adlao
  • Cynthia Brantley-Price
  • James Gould, General Planner
  • Steven Ross, City Planner and Environmental Consultant
  • Teresa Clark, Affordable Housing Developer
  • Heidi Goldstein, Commissioner BUSD Personnel Commission
  • Lura Dolas, Senior Lecturer, UC Berkeley
  • Dorothy Walker, Former Assistant Vice Chancellor
  • Rufus Pichler, Partner at Morrison Foerster
  • Karen Weinstein, Candidate Board of Trustees, Peralta Colleges
  • Mim Hawley, Former District 5 Councilmember

Preguntas y Respuestas

Preguntas de League of Women Voters—Berkeley, Albany, Emeryville (4)

If you are elected, what would you like to achieve during your term in office?
Respuesta de Stephen Murphy:

As a City Councilmember, I will work to create a civil atmosphere at public meetings and in City government. Civility is what will help us reach compromises that are good for our community and will help us confront the complex struggles of our changing city with sensitivity and compassion.

I’ll work to provide resources to improve infrastructure in Berkeley, including parks, streets, and walkways. Solano Avenue and many other Berkeley neighborhoods are suffering from a lack of small businesses. I will work to:

·       Lower economic and regulatory barriers to business entry.

·       Move the Downtown Area Plan forward in significant ways. I’ll advocate for a vibrant downtown with sustainable growth, a green economy, and more housing along transit corridors.

·       Consider vacancy tax for long-empty sites to finance redevelopment (e.g. lower economic barriers to business entry).

·       Continue my focus on attracting a tenant to the Oaks Theatre site and work to preserve it as a community space.

·       Limit Big Box businesses on Solano by fostering a favorable investment environment for small business.

What do you consider the most important issue facing the city?
Respuesta de Stephen Murphy:

 

My life’s commitment is to live in a diverse community where people have choices for affordable housing and legal aid for the needy, for good jobs and small business ownership, and for excellent public schools. I want Berkeley to remain a city fashioned by all and for all, a community where middle and working class families can establish a home and strong roots.

This means addressing our housing and affordability crisis. I support developments of affordable housing and believe the City of Berkeley should encourage such developments. As a middle-class professional with a family, I also recognize the need for housing that is affordable for people who don’t qualify for deeply affordable housing. I believe in development of housing that is available to a diverse population, especially the middle class.

I want to improve public safety and resources for the homeless. Many of the people I work with at the Alameda County Family Justice Center are or have been homeless, and I have seen firsthand how difficult it is to escape homelessness. My work has helped me understand that the vast majority of people who are homeless have been victims of many layers of abuse over the course of a long period of time. These people need a vast network of resources in order to truly get help. This requires a long-term, regional plan, and a collective, housing first, case management focused model. Realistically, the problem can’t be fixed right away, but we must work together to make progress. I believe that basic rules coupled with reliably available resources is an important strategy in order to tackle this issue.

How do you plan to balance the regional Planned Bay Area (ABAG/MTC) goals of Priority Development Areas (PDAs) with local needs of property owners, traffic/parking/congestion problems, and other local concerns?
Respuesta de Stephen Murphy:

I support Berkeley's award winning Downtown Area Plan which aligns with the ABAG/MTC goals and is also balanced with the needs of locals. Many of Berkeley's current races revolve around whether or not a candidate supports the Downtown Area Plan outlined below. Those who are for or against this plan tend to line up with the factions who were for or against Measure R in 2014. I led the effort to defeat Measure R in 2014; 80% of District 5 voters agreed with me and voted “no."

It is my intention and goal to: 

      Build consensus on City Council for sound, reasonable, progressive policies.

      Support the Downtown Area Plan, created after hundreds of public meetings and passed overwhelmingly by voters.

      Work for a vibrant downtown with sustainable growth and a green economy.

      Support a bikable and walkable downtown featuring great shopping and entertainment venues to foster compact and convenient residential life.

      Work for denser “green” development as smart growth in transit corridors to address our critical housing shortage and create environmental benefits by enabling new residents to reduce their carbon footprint. 

A green downtown with transit corridors will create:

      A more favorable business environment for local business,

      Hundreds of affordable units,

      Funding for affordable housing through fees paid by developers,

      New buildings with high, yet feasible environmental standards,

      Housing close to public transportation, reducing the need for driving,

      Millions of dollars for public art,

      Thousands of union jobs,

      Increased car share and bike parking,

      Street and public space improvements,

      Millions of dollars worth of economic development and assessments going toward our general fund.

Considering the disintegration of local infrastructure, how can the city upgrade to meet the current regulatory requirements for clean air and for clean water discharge into the Bay?
Respuesta de Stephen Murphy:

With regard to air pollution and green house gas emissions, I support quality high-density housing around transit corridors. Residents can more readily walk, utilize clean public transit and shrink their carbon footprint.

I am also very interested in studying how public spaces, such as buildings and thoroughfares might be utilized to supplement residential solar installation. Residential rooftop solar is a wonderful source of clean energy. However, many residents have poor sun exposure or excess shading. One alternative could be enabling residents to invest their solar dollars in community installations whereby solar uses public space but is financed with private dollars. For example, parking spaces at BART could be covered with solar panels. Such installations could reduce lifecycle costs of the system because they are more economical to install and maintain, and they perform more efficiently.

As for clean water discharge into the Bay, deteriorating sewer connections are a major focus for CWA compliance. Since October 2006, property owners have been required to obtain a Sewer Lateral Certificate of Compliance (SLC) prior to transfer or sale of property, or before obtaining a building permit for major construction projects such as remodels. Berkeley also offers a loan program to assist low-income property owners to comply with requirements for private sewer laterals. I support these mechanisms because they allow homeowners to amortize cost over time and there are assistance programs for low-income residents.

We can use all of these ideas to re-imagine other solutions to ever more complex and interrelated issues in a world where global climate change is perhaps our greatest environmental challenge.

 

 

Creencias poliza

Documentos sobre determinadas posturas

Homelessness and Housing

Summary

My personal and professional work with underserved communiities, how I propose to deal with Berkeley's challenges to address homelessness and my comitment to ease the city's affordable housing shortage.

As Associate Director of the Alameda County Family Justice Center, I work daily with disenfranchised people who are survivors of assault, abuse, and trafficking. Many are homeless. This helps me understand that the vast majority of homeless people have suffered abuse or neglect over time, creating a ripple effect not only on those individuals and families but on the community at large.

To deal compassionately with people living on our streets. I propose:

      Developing a holistic long-term regional system to address core issues causing homelessness, a system that follows a “housing-first model” that’s case management-focused.

      Increasing city funding for more housing and services.

      Engaging other cities and counties to jointly create a system of regional resources, based on Berkeley’s model, The Hub, a coordinated entry point for homeless to receive housing and other resources in one place.

      Funding more resources, including intensive case management for the most vulnerable with more housing and beds for homeless individuals and families.

I favor the Community Sidewalk Ordinance -- my opponent opposes it -- the ordinance is compassionate and fair. It sets limits on inappropriate behavior and also provides important services, such as more public bathrooms.

      Homelessness is different than dangerous and unhealthy street behavior.

      It is reasonable to prohibit public urination or defecation and limit the amount of space a person can take up on the sidewalk.

As a member of the Berkeley Food and Housing Project's Capital Campaign, I'm working to realistically address the City's increasing homelessness problem. This topic is personal for me. I work with homeless individuals every day, and I recognize the different sides of the story. I’m committed to finding compassionate and sustainable solutions.

Housing affordability is a challenge. People should be able to afford to live and retire here. As Chair of the Planning Commission, I’ve worked extensively to ease the affordable housing shortage and will continue identifying effective alternatives.

      Housing in the Downtown Plan creates more density along transit corridors so residents will have easy transit access without needing cars.

      Financing low cost and more affordable housing can be done through Berkeley’s Housing Trust Fund, established from fees imposed on developers ($10.5 million slated as a Harold Way project requirement).

      We can use those funds to support development of affordable housing; the City of Berkeley should encourage such projects.

      Housing must also be affordable for people who don’t qualify for low cost housing including teachers and other public service professionals. I advocate for extending housing subsidies to working families.

      I support alternatives like Accessory Dwelling Units (or “granny flats”). I was instrumental in making it easier to legalize and create ADUs in Berkeley as a source of low-cost housing -- much less expensive than building a traditional infill unit.

Economic Development, Financial Management and my Plans for Downtown and our Commercial districts

Summary

We need leaders who envision a city that works - financially, environmentally, and commercially - and who have rock solid, tangible plans for how to bring this about. If our city works, we can address problems of homelessness and housing more effectively. And if we elect leaders who know how to work together cooperatively and collaboratively, we can move Berkeley forward together.

 

My goals are to create an economically lively downtown, a reinvigorated Solano Ave., a bustling Gourmet Ghetto, and a delicious Hopkins/Monterey neighborhood.

      Support small business viability in our neighborhoods and downtown. Business sustainability is the engine of economic growth.

      Examine and fix Berkeley’s commercial regulations to foster, not hinder, a viable economy. Identify barriers that slow or increase the cost of developing commercial enterprises with the aim of eliminating them.

The Challenges:

      Our City’s significant unfunded liabilities associated with pension obligations and infrastructure costs.

      Our City budget -- a majority goes towards public safety costs.

The Solutions:

      Be fiscally responsible in spending our money.

      I support the infrastructure bond – Measure T1.

      Remain focused on economic development to increase city revenue.

 

I fully support our Downtown revitalization because it will increase revenue. As Chair of the Planning Commission, as the person who led the ground campaign to defeat Measure R in 2014.  I have a proven track record of supporting economic development.

Downtown

      Build consensus on City Council for sound, reasonable, progressive policies.

      Support award-winning Downtown Area Plan, created after hundreds of public meetings and passed overwhelmingly by voters.

      Measure R in 2014, tried to upend it and it lost by a 3-to-1 margin. 

      I led the effort to reject Measure R; 80% of District 5 voters agreed with me and voted NO.

      Work for a vibrant downtown with sustainable growth, a green economy.

      Support a bikeable and walkable downtown featuring great shopping and entertainment venues to foster compact and convenient residential life.

      Work for denser “green” development as smart growth in transit corridors to address our critical housing shortage and create environment benefits by enabling new residents to reduce their carbon footprint.

A green downtown with transit corridors will create:

      A more favorable business environment for local business,

      Hundreds of affordable units,

      Funding for affordable housing through fees paid by developers,

      New buildings with high, yet feasible environmental standards,

      Housing close to public transportation, reducing the need for driving,

      Millions of dollars for public art,

      Thousands of union jobs,

      Increased car share and bike parking,

      Street and public space improvements,

      Millions of dollars worth of economic development and assessments going toward our general fund.

Specifically in District 5

Provide resources to improve infrastructure in District 5, including parks, streets, and walkways. Solano Avenue is suffering from a lack of small businesses. 

      Lower economic and regulatory barriers to business entry. Let's consider an online one-stop shop where new small businesses can start the permit process and recieve faster service. 

      Continue my focus on attracting a tenant to the Oaks Theatre site.

      Consider vacancy tax for long-empty sites to finance redevelopment (e.g. lower economic barriers to business entry).

      Work to preserve the Oaks Theatre as a community space.

      Limit Big Box businesses on Solano by fostering a favorable investment environment for small business.

Berkeley At its Best

Summary

Quality of Life Includes Art, Public Safety, Education Excellence and Equity, and Building Community. Berkeley is famous for education but part of the lifestyle that goes with that is having a culturally vibrant community that celebrates diversity and values human interaction. It can all hang together, supported by a solid economic base, with a feeling of safety and security, if our public services serve us all well.

 

Education and Youth

Berkeley public schools are among of the best in the country, and I’m immensely proud to be able to send my children to them. I will work to:

      Ensure excellence in our public schools so all our children can receive a quality education.

      Support our teachers by placing a priority on finding ways to increase the number of classroom aides.

      Continue to invest in public education through BSEP (Measure E1 on this year’s ballot).

      Work with our state Legislative officials to advocate funding for universal Pre-School to narrow the achievement gap, a persistent problem through high school.

      My work at the Alameda Family Justice Center focused on children who endured trauma. I know how important it is to provide these resources for vulnerable children.

      I’ve witnessed cost savings in keeping these children out of foster care, hospitals, out of a life of crime. We get great social returns.

      Support our teenagers by ensuring full funding for the city-run mental health center inside Berkeley High to support kids facing trauma from trouble at home or bullying and harassment at school.

      Continue the work I began as Vice Chair on the Commission on the Status of Women, working with Karen Weinstein, Heidi Goldstein, and students in BHS Stop Harassing.

Public Safety

Public Safety is a high priority in District 5. I walk down Cedar Street every day with my three young children. and I engage with police and public safety officers every day in my work with domestic violence and sexual assault victims.

      Right now there is only one patrol assigned to all of Districts 5 & 6, and that is not enough. I’ll work to ensure District 5 has the patrols and services we need to reduce crime and keep our neighborhoods safe.

      Planning priorities must include pedestrian safety with walkable streets and more bike paths to ease traffic congestion (and to make biking safer and more fun).

      We should align the needs of bicyclists and drivers with street repair and road design.

      I’ll improve both police presence and engagement in our community through neighborhood meetings to address fears about crime and to improve community coordination for earthquake preparation.

I am honored that both the Berkeley Police Association and the Berkeley Firefighters Association (who even walked precincts with me!) have endorsed my campaign. They put their lives on the line for us every day as first responders, and I'll make sure that public safety is a top priority in District 5. This strong trust relationship with our police and fire professionals makes me uniquely qualified to work with them to identify pragmatic solutions.

 Quality of Life, Art, and Building Community

Today, Berkeley residents are grappling with the realities of

      Increasing inequalities in wealth,

      Diminishing affordability, and

      Arguments about how our public spaces should look and feel.

I believe that:

      Art offers an important channel to address these factors,

      Artists can help identify solutions. They can think of ways to make public spaces that are beautiful and captivating for a diverse population, and, perhaps most importantly, they can help us think about how the city’s aesthetics affect our collective state of mind and sense of community.

      We must facilitate opportunities to bring artists into the conversation as often as possible.

 I helped lead the charge for the 1% for Art project, I’m proud it is law, and I’m excited to see the results.

      The program mandates developers of large new developments in commercial districts to incorporate an art piece worth 1% of construction costs or pay an in-lieu fee to the Cultural Trust Fund.

      The program means that local artists will have the chance to make their mark across the city, and that our public spaces will be as compelling as possible. The program will create new buildings that people love to come to, which will drive economic growth and a stronger sense of community.

      The in-lieu fees for the Cultural Trust Fund also offer an incredible opportunity to increase artists’ presence around the city. The funds can be use to finance more projects for public and community spaces.

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