presents
Voter’s Edge California
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Presentado por
MapLight
League of Women Voters of California Education Fund
California Common Cause@CommonCauseCA
November 5, 2019 — Local Elections
Local

City of San Francisco
Proposition D Ordinance - 2/3 Approval Required

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Resultados electorales

Passing

135,702 votos si (67.7%)

64,883 votos no (32.3%)

Shall the City impose a 1.5% business tax on shared rides and a 3.25% business tax on private rides for fares charged by commercial ride-share and driverless-vehicle companies until November 5, 2045, raising an estimated $30-35 million annually, to fund improvements in Muni service and bicycle and pedestrian safety?

¿Qué es esta propuesta?

Pros y Contras — Explicación objetiva con argumentos a favor y en contra

Fuente: League of Women Voters of San Francisco

La pregunta

Shall the city impose a business tax of 1.5% on shared-ride fares and 3.25% on private-ride fares within the City taken with commercial ride-share companies to fund improvements in Muni service, and pedestrian and bicycle safety?

Note: This Pro/Con information is also available in Spanish and Chinese.

La situación

In 2018, the state legislature passed and the governor signed into law Assembly Bill 1184, which allows San Francisco to impose a business tax on fares originating in San Francisco with commercial ride-share companies such as Uber and Lyft.

Many major cities, including New York, Chicago, and Washington, D.C., have already imposed similar taxes in an effort to mitigate increased traffic congestion. By some estimates, well over half of the increase in traffic congestion in the last ten years is the result of the use of ride-share companies.

La propuesta

This ordinance, effective January 1, 2020, would impose a business tax on rides within the city taken with commercial ride-share companies, which are typically requested through an online platform that connects riders with drivers. This would include rides with companies like Uber and Lyft.

Rides would be taxed at the following rates:

       1.5% of the total fare for shared rides (rides with multiple individual customers in the car), through Nov. 5, 2045

       3.25% on private-ride fares, through Nov. 5, 2045

       1.5% for all rides in electric (zero-emission) vehicles, through Dec. 31, 2024

The city would be able to impose the same taxes on rides in autonomous (driverless) vehicles should they become available. The tax would not apply to taxis and paratransit companies.

These taxes would be paid by the ride-share companies but could be passed on to consumers.

Revenue from these taxes would be deposited in the Traffic Congestion Mitigation Fund and would be shared equally between the San Francisco Municipal Transit Authority, to improve Muni services, and the San Francisco County Transportation Authority, which oversees the Vision Zero plan to improve pedestrian and bicycle safety.  Vision Zero aims to eliminate traffic-related deaths in the city by 2024.

A “YES” Vote Means: You want to authorize business taxes on city rides in commercial ride-share vehicles to fund improvements in Muni service and pedestrian and bicycle safety.

A “NO” Vote Means: You oppose authorizing these taxes.

Efectos fiscales

If passed, this ordinance would generate $30–35 million in additional tax revenue annually.

https://sfelections.sfgov.org/sites/default/files/Documents/candidates/Nov2019_PropD_Controller.pdf

Sus partidarios dicen

ARGUMENTS IN FAVOR OF PROP D:

       Prop D will ease traffic in San Francisco and make our streets safer for pedestrians and bicyclists.

       This small tax on ride-share fares will help Muni hire, retain and train more drivers, buy more vehicles, and improve its services and facilities.

       This measure will mitigate traffic by encouraging people to take public transportation, walk, bike, or take shared rides.

Sus oponentes dicen

 

ARGUMENTS AGAINST PROP D:

       This tax does not go far enough and will not have any substantial impact on traffic congestion in San Francisco.

        This tax could result in increasing traffic congestion by incentivizing people to drive their own vehicles instead of sharing rides.

       This tax will only make living in San Francisco even more expensive.

 

Información básica sobre la iniciativa de ley — Información oficial sobre esta iniciativa

Un voto por el SÍ significa

A "YES" Vote Means: If you vote "yes," you want to impose a 1.5% business tax on shared rides and a 3.25% business tax on private rides for fares charged by commercial ride-share and driverless-vehicle companies to fund improvements in Muni service and bicycle and pedestrian safety.

Un voto por el NO significa

A "NO" Vote Means: If you vote "no," you do not want to impose this business tax.

Resumen

Ballot Simplification Committee

The Way It Is Now: The City does not impose a business tax on fares charged by commercial ride-share companies.

Commercial ride-share companies provide passenger rides for a fare. These companies also arrange shared rides, and each passenger pays a separate fare. Typically, rides are requested using an online platform to connect drivers with passengers.

Taxis and paratransit companies are not commercial ride-share companies.

In the future, the State may authorize companies to charge passengers for rides in driverless vehicles.

The San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency (SFMTA) is a City agency that oversees the City’s transportation system, including Muni buses and trains, bicycles, traffic, parking and taxis. The San Francisco County Transportation Authority (SFCTA) is a County agency separate from the City that funds and plans transportation projects. The San Francisco Board of Supervisors serves as the governing board of the SFCTA.

The Proposal: Starting Jan. 1, 2020, Proposition D would impose a business tax on commercial rideshare companies for fares generated by rides that start in San Francisco as follows:

• 1.5% on a shared-ride fare; and

• 3.25% on a private-ride fare.

The same business tax would also apply to driverlessvehicle companies. The City would impose these taxes on fares charged by these companies until Nov. 5, 2045.

Passenger rides in zero-emission vehicles would be subject to a 1.5% business tax until Dec. 31, 2024.

The City would deposit the tax revenues (estimated at $30 million to $35 million annually) into a Traffic Congestion Mitigation Fund to spend for the following purposes:

• The SFMTA would receive roughly half of the revenues to improve Muni service and reliability, maintain and expand Muni vehicles and facilities, and improve Muni station access; and

• The SFCTA would receive roughly half of the revenues to improve pedestrian and bicycle safety.

Efectos fiscales

City Controller Ben Rosenfield

Should the proposed ordinance be approved by the voters, in my opinion, it would result in an annual tax revenue increase to the City of approximately $30 to $35 million. The proposed tax is a dedicated tax and proceeds would be deposited into the Traffic Congestion Mitigation Fund.

The proposed ordinance would amend the City’s Business Tax and Regulations Code to impose an excise tax of 3.25 percent of the passenger fare, excluding any taxes, fees, and other government charges, for rides provided by transportation network companies and mobility providers of autonomous vehicles and private transit service vehicles. The rate for shared rides would be 1.5 percent. The tax would be effective January 1, 2020 for rides originating in San Francisco, and expire on November 5, 2045. Rides provided in zero-emission vehicles from January 1, 2020 through December 31, 2024 would be taxed at 1.5 percent.

The proposed ordinance would establish the Traffic Congestion Mitigation Fund. After allowable administrative costs, 50 percent of the Fund would provide funding for the Municipal Transportation Agency for Muni transit service and affordability, system reliability and capacity, and keeping transit infrastructure in a state of good repair, for defined purposes. The remaining 50 percent would provide funding for the San Francisco County Transportation Authority for planning, design studies, and/or capital improvements that promote users’ safety in the public right-of-way, for defined purposes. The proposed ordinance authorizes the City to pledge revenues of the Fund to the repayment of limited tax bonds, up to $300,000,000.

Published Arguments — Arguments for and against the ballot measure

¿Quién está a favor y en contra de esta iniciativa de ley?

Sí por Proposition D

Organizaciónes (5)

Funcionarios electos y designados (0)
No por Proposition D

Organizaciónes (1)

Funcionarios electos y designados (0)

Más información

Videos (1)

— October 11, 2019 League of Women Voters of San Francisco and SFGovTV
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