presents
Voter's Edge California Voter Guide
Get the facts before you vote.
Brought to you by
MapLight
League of Women Voters of California Education Fund
California Common Cause@CommonCauseCA
March 3, 2020 — Primary Election
We depend on your support.
Share your knowledge

Text VOTE to 52000 to donate $10.

Do you feel better informed having used Voter's Edge?

Help us inform other voters.

Special District

Rancho Santiago Community College District
Measure L Bond Measure - 55% Approval Required

To learn more about measures, follow the links for each tab in this section. For most screenreaders, you can hit Return or Enter to enter a tab and read the content within.

Election Results

Failed

53,927 votes yes (51.8%)

50,112 votes no (48.2%)

100% of precincts reporting (357/357).

104,029 ballots counted.

To upgrade classrooms/labs to improve student and veteran access to affordable, high-quality education and career training in science, technology, engineering, math and skilled trades at Santa Ana College and Santiago Canyon College; repair deteriorating roofs/plumbing/electrical systems; and construct/acquire classrooms/facilities/equipment, shall the Rancho Santiago Community College District measure authorizing $496,000,000 in bonds at legal rates, levying 2¢ per $100 of assessed value ($25,700,000 annually) while bonds are outstanding, be approved, with citizen oversight, independent audits and local control?

What is this proposal?

Measure Details — Official information about this measure

YES vote means

A “YES” vote is a vote in favor of authorizing the District to issue and sell $496,000,000 in general obligation bonds.

 

NO vote means

A “NO” vote is a vote against authorizing the District to issue and sell $496,000,000 in general obligation bonds.

Impartial analysis / Proposal

Rancho Santiago Community College District Measure L

This measure was placed on the ballot by the governing board (“Board”) of the Rancho Santiago Community College District (“District”). This measure, if approved by 55 percent of the votes cast on the measure, will authorize the District to issue and sell $496,000,000 in general obligation bonds. The sale of these bonds by the District represents a debt of the District.

Voter approval of this measure will also authorize an annual tax to be levied on taxable property in the District to generate revenue to pay principal and interest on the bonds. The District’s stated best estimate in its tax rate statement of the average annual tax rate required to fund the bonds is $19.74 per $100,000 of assessed value. The District’s best estimate of the highest annual tax rate required to fund the bonds is $19.75 per $100,000 of assessed value.

Proceeds from the sale of bonds authorized by this measure may only be used by the District for the construction, reconstruction, rehabilitation or replacement of school facilities, including the furnishing and equipping of school facilities, or the acquisition or lease of real property for school facilities. A complete list of the projects and allowed expenditures, which bonds proceeds may be spent on, is included in the full text of the measure.

The Board has certified that it has evaluated college and student safety, class size, enrollment trends, and information technology needs in developing its project list.

The California Constitution provides that proceeds of school district bond measures cannot be used for teacher or administrator salaries or other operating expenses and requires independent annual performance and financial audits. State law requires the establishment of an independent citizens oversight committee for ensuring that bond proceeds are expended as specified in the measure and as provided by law.

Approval of Measure L does not guarantee that the proposed project or projects in the District that are the subject of the bonds under Measure L will be funded beyond the local revenues generated by Measure L. The District’s proposal for the project or projects may assume the receipt of matching state funds, which could be subject to appropriation by the Legislature or approval of a statewide bond measure.

A “YES” vote is a vote in favor of authorizing the District to issue and sell $496,000,000 in general obligation bonds.

A “NO” vote is a vote against authorizing the District to issue and sell $496,000,000 in general obligation bonds.

Tax rate

Rancho Santiago Community College District Measure L

An election will be held within Rancho Santiago Community College District (the “District”) on March 3, 2020, for the purpose of submitting to the electors of the District the question of incurring a bonded indebtedness of the District in the principal amount of $496,000,000. If such bonds are authorized and sold, the principal thereof and interest thereon will be payable from the proceeds of taxes levied on the taxable property in the District.

The following information regarding tax rates is given in compliance with Section 9401 of the California Elections Code. This information is based upon the best estimates and projections presently available from official sources, upon experience within the District and other demonstrable factors.

Based upon the foregoing and projections of the assessed valuations of taxable property in the District, and assuming the entire debt service on the bonds will be paid through property taxation:

1. The best estimate from official sources of the average annual tax rate that would be required to be levied to fund the bond issue over the entire duration of the bond debt service, based on estimated assessed valuations available at the time of the filing of this statement, or on a projection based on experience within the District or other demonstrable factors, is $0.02 per $100 ($19.74 per $100,000) of assessed valuation of all property. The final fiscal year in which the tax to be levied to fund the bond issue is anticipated to be collected is fiscal year 2049-50

2. The best estimate from official sources of the highest tax rate that would be required to be levied to fund the bond issue and an estimate of the year in which that rate will apply, based on estimated assessed valuations available at the time of the filing of this statement, is $0.02 per $100 $19.75 per $100,000) of assessed valuation of all property to be taxed and the year 2030-31.

3. The best estimate from official sources of the total debt service, including the principal and interest that would be required to be repaid if all the bonds are issued and sold, is $771.05 million.

Attention of voters is directed to the fact that the foregoing information is based upon projections and estimates. The actual timing of sales of the bonds and the amount to be sold at any time will be governed by the needs of the District and other factors. The actual interest rates at which the bonds will be sold, which will not exceed the maximum permitted by law, will depend upon the bond market at the time of sale. The actual assessed valuations in future years will depend upon the value of property within the District as determined in the assessment and the equalization process.

Assessed valuation is not the same as market price of real property. Therefore, the actual tax rates and the years in which those tax rates will be applicable may vary from those presently estimated and stated above.

s/ Marvin Martinez

Chancellor, Rancho Santiago Community College District

Published Arguments — Arguments for and against the ballot measure

Arguments FOR

Vote YES on L to ensure local students and veterans have access to affordable, quality education at Santa Ana College and Santiago Canyon College.

Because the cost of attending the Cal-State, UC systems and private universities has become so expensive, more students are starting their education at community colleges. Nearly 1/3 of local high school graduates rely on our community colleges for higher education and career training.

We need Measure L to upgrade Santa Ana College and Santiago Canyon College, so middle income and low income students who can’t afford the high price of university still have an opportunity to succeed in college and careers.

Measure L also improves our Student and Veterans’ Centers so the thousands of military veterans returning from service receive the job training, job placement, counseling and support they need.

Vote YES on L:

● Upgrade classrooms and labs to help students complete the first two years of college affordably, and transfer to the Cal-State or UC systems

● Repair leaky roofs, old rusty plumbing, faulty electrical systems and dry rotted beams

● Modernize school facilities to improve access for students with disabilities

● Improve student safety and campus security systems 

● Upgrade classrooms, labs, and career training facilities for science, technology, engineering, math, biotech and skilled trades

Clear System of Fiscal Accountability:

● Every penny of Measure L stays local to support Santa Ana College and Santiago Canyon College – no funds can be taken by the State

● A project list, Citizens’ Oversight Committee and independent audits are required

● By law, no funds can be spent on staff salaries or pensions Our community relies on Santa Ana College and Santiago Canyon College to educate the healthcare professionals, police, firefighters and skilled workers who keep us healthy, safe, and fuel our economy.

Education, business and community leaders agree: Vote YES on L to provide the affordable, quality education our students deserve. www.CampaignForOurColleges.org

s/ Phillip E. Yarbrough

Board Member, Rancho Santiago Community College District/

Businessman

s/ Gaddi H. Vasquez

U.S. Ambassador (ret.) and Santa Ana College Graduate

s/ Kenneth Nguyen

Former Citizens’ Oversight Committee Member, RSCCD and Santa Ana

Planning Commissioner

s/ Claudia C. Alvarez

President, Rancho Santiago Community College District Board of

Trustees/Attorney

s/ James Doti

President Emeritus and Professor of Economics, Chapman University

Arguments AGAINST

The USA like SAC is at a crossroads. No one wants to attend. Neither with free tuition, nor free bus passes. Constant construction has made it a white elephant. I recommend a personal visit. 17th & Bristol is the busiest intersection in OC. It has newly planted palm trees in the center divider & what looks like a sewer run-off hugging the campus.

If there is such a thing as a SAC expert-- that would be me! 7 degrees earned! Diane Keaton lived across the street, & Michelle Pfeiffer was born across the street.

The buildings at Centennial Park are owned by SAC. However, the property is city owned. After a 7-year run, “Issues And... PS Rocco” (cable-TV) was removed. The show was censored because of its anti-corruption stance, & Rocco ran for mayor. Not once did “El Don” ever mention that Rocco was a candidate for mayor, city council or trustee.

Organized Crime entered SAC when John Hanna (SA Commissioner) was appointed trustee. His law building buddy Frank Barbara is Pulido’s personal lawyer. Both are ex-Democratic Party Chairman.

Like a degree in Ethnic Studies? Educating serial killers in specialized race hate. Santa Ana is the capital of the illegal alien. The FBI abandoned the city a long time ago. It was the intention of serial killer Izzy Ocampo to major in police science, at SAC. Rocco was baited to be murdered by him, & the Rocco case has been has been the inspiration of other serial killers. (James Holmes anniversary killings & others.)

SAC arrested homeless (American refugees) for using their bathroom. A recent murder & rape, on campus, prove the facility unsafe!

BEHIND THE ORANGE CURTAIN has been updated & timelined. The Rocco authored book gives annotated facts!

Federal laws are not being obeyed. Is it any wonder that no one is

happy?

s/ Steve Rocco

Replies to Arguments FOR

SINS, LIES, CRIMES

(1) Two bogus bonds have already passed, 

(2) SAC admits to a 10% illegal student body,

(3) Aiding & abetting illegals is a federal crime,

(4) College District Headquartes: a highrise, no-use monstrosity, on Santa Clara/ i.e. the Eddie Hernandez/Miguel Pulido Conspiracy. (Remember: The Chancellor’s Ball?) Lou Correa had an office, in the building,

(5) Advocates Mexican supremacy & discrimination of Americans,

(6) Centennial Park is not college property. Threw out community public access, yet kept SAC telecommunications Department,

(7) CHAPMAN UNIVERSITY PARTNERSHIP: Hedonism, Atheism, Materialism,

(8) Arrested Homeless taking showers, yet allows undocumented students to do the same,

(9) Middle College: Underaged students on campus? Battery & murder have happened,

(10) PARTNERSHIP: Hired CHRISTOPHER ALLEN GRIFFITH to teach a Women’s Defense Class. A Chapman U alumnus, Orange City Detective, & Anthony Rackauckas’ neighbor. He & Rackauckas’ wife conspire: 1ST Rocco Home Invasion. Rocco’ lawsuit win: False news revealed. The end of OC WEEKLY(Editors: Gustavo Arellano & Nick Schou, others). MARK D. McCAIN/ALBERTSON CEO son & others murdered, International asymmetrical war continues to this day Americans: impoverished, drugged, disenfranchised,

(11) Virtually, a 1-Race College! Run by a 1-Race City Council/Trustees! & the taxpayer is: the unrepresented American.

s/ Steve Rocco

Replies to Arguments AGAINST

The lone opponent has a long track record of making a mockery of important community issues. He’s done it again with his incoherent argument.

Measure L is no laughing matter. It ensures that veterans who have served our country and those who serve our community as nurses, firefighters, police officers and paramedics have access to affordable higher education and job training.

Here’s why Measure L is so important:

● The cost of UC and Cal State universities has skyrocketed and more students are relying on Santa Ana College and Santiago Canyon College than ever before. Measure L is essential to providing the quality higher education local students deserve.

● Measure L makes critical upgrades to classrooms, labs and career training facilities to allow students to complete their first two years of college affordably and transfer to universities.

● Santa Ana College and Santiago Canyon College fuel our local economy by training the skilled workers local employers need, generating over $1.6 billion per year in economic activity. Measure L allows Santa Ana College and Santiago Canyon College to remain vital community and economic resources that train our workforce.

● Our veterans returning from service rely on Santa Ana College and Santiago Canyon College for job training, counseling and support services. Now is the time to upgrade ourVeterans’ Centers to continue serving our veterans well. Measure L is a wise investment in our local colleges – it requires local control, an independent citizens’ oversight committee and mandatory audits, so we can be sure every penny will be spent as promised.

We support our community, our veterans and our colleges. We are proud to support Measure L.

www.CampaignForOurColleges.org

s/ Phillip E. Yarbrough

Board Member, Rancho Santiago Community College District/

Businessman

s/ Gaddi H. Vasquez

U.S. Ambassador (ret.) and Santa Ana College Graduate

s/ Jonathan Hernandez

Santa Ana College Student and Veteran

s/ Claudia C. Alvarez

President, Rancho Santiago Community College District Board of

Trustees/Attorney

s/ James Doti

President Emeritus and Professor of Economics, Chapman University

Use tabs to select your choice. Use return to create a choice. You can access your choices by navigating to 'My Choices'.

Please share this site to help others research their voting choices.

PUBLISHING:PRODUCTION SERVER:PRODUCTION